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Lions Bay woman slapped with injunction over allegedly providing illegal Botox injections

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia is warning the public against receiving medical procedures from unlicensed practitioners.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia is warning the public against receiving medical procedures from unlicensed practitioners. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Jacquelyn Martin

The body that regulates B.C. doctors has won a permanent court injunction against a woman accused of giving illegal cosmetic injections.

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia said it first became aware of Minoo Iromloo in 2018 after a member of the public alleged they had received cosmetic medical procedures in a Lions Bay home.

The college investigated and said it determined that Iromloo had given the patient Botox injections and dermal fillers.

READ MORE: Vaughan nurse charged after woman’s death linked to illegal cosmetic procedure

The patient complained that as a result of the procedures, they had suffered bruising, headaches and pain and had been unable to work for a time.

WATCH (Aired November 2016): Woman in botched Botox fraud case is ordered to undergo psychiatric assessment

Woman in botched Botox fraud case is ordered to undergo psychiatric assessment
Woman in botched Botox fraud case is ordered to undergo psychiatric assessment

“This case underscores the importance of seeing a regulated health professional for cosmetic injections,” said the college’s chief legal counsel, Graeme Keirstead, in a media release.

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“Ms. Iromloo is not a registrant of the college and is not licensed to practice medicine in British Columbia.”

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According to the college, Iromloo has been issued with a consent order banning her from administering, diagnosing or advising on the use of Botox or dermal fillers.

She is also banned from presenting herself to be a physician in any way, including using any names or titles that may imply she’s licensed to practice medicine in B.C.

“Receiving a medical service such as injections from an unlicensed practitioner is risky and has the potential for complications, including reaction to agents, infections or greater harm due to human error,” said the college in a media release.

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“There is no assurance that the practitioner is competent or qualified to provide treatment or that the material and equipment used are safe.”

The college added that anyone who has been treated by an unlicensed medical practitioner should consult with their family physician.