Advertisement

B.C. election 2020: NDP maintains big lead in the polls following televised debate

Click to play video 'Highlights from the B.C. Leaders’ Debate' Highlights from the B.C. Leaders’ Debate
SFU political science lecturer Stewart Prest discusses the key exchanges from the B.C. leaders' debate – Oct 14, 2020

With just over a week left in B.C. election campaign, a new poll suggests the BC NDP continues to enjoy a big lead over the BC Liberals following Tuesday’s televised leaders’ debate.

According to a survey released Friday by the Angus Reid Institute, the New Democrats have the support of 49 per cent of voters, which is 16 points ahead of the Liberals at 33 per cent support. The Greens have 14 per cent.

Click to play video 'B.C. Leaders debate debrief: Will Sonia Furstenau’s strong performance give the Green Party a boost?' B.C. Leaders debate debrief: Will Sonia Furstenau’s strong performance give the Green Party a boost?
B.C. Leaders debate debrief: Will Sonia Furstenau’s strong performance give the Green Party a boost? – Oct 14, 2020

Much of the NDP’s strength appears to be in Metro Vancouver where 60 per cent of residents say they support the incumbents, the survey suggests.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more: ‘A giant hot air balloon with not much in it’: Memorable quotes from the B.C. leaders’ debate

Among those who saw or read about Tuesday’s leaders’ debate, 29 per cent said BC NDP Leader John Horgan had the strongest performance. BC Greens Leader Sonia Furstenau was preferred by 23 per cent, while 15 per cent favoured BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson.

Insights West also released a poll this week, which showed the NDP with a 14-point lead over the Liberals.

Read more: B.C. election 2020 promise tracker: What the major parties are pledging

Prior to Tuesday’s debate, another poll by Ipsos suggested 52 per cent of decided voters said they will vote for the NDP, compared to 34 per cent for the Liberals and 11 per cent for the Greens.

The Angus Reid Institute conducted an online survey from Oct. 14  to15 among a representative randomized sample of 801 adults in B.C. The margin of error is considered to be plus or minus 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. 

— With files from Gord Macdonald and Richard Zussman