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Hamilton sees increase in whooping cough cases: city

Hamilton public health are urging residents to make sure are up to date on their vaccination in light of a recent whooping cough outbreak. Alexa MacLean / Global News

Five confirmed cases of whooping cough have Hamilton Public Health Services urging residents to make sure their vaccinations are up to date.

In a release on Friday, the city’s health agency reported the recent cases coming in since mid-May.

“Vaccination against whooping cough is an important measure to protect individuals and reduce the spread of the infection within the community,” the city said in a statement, “The vaccine that protects against whooping cough (pertussis) is called Tdap, and includes a booster dose of Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis.”

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In its statement, the city references the Tdap vaccine and recommends any child 12 years of age or older who haven’t had their booster vaccine to either contact their primary care provider, family physician, nurse practitioner or to visit a walk-in clinic.

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“This is a good reminder for parents to ensure their child’s vaccinations are up to date,” the city’s Associate Medical Officer of Health Dr. Bart Harvey said in a statement, “Vaccination against whooping cough is an important measure to protect community health and reduce the spread of illness within the community.”

READ MORE: Remember to get your vaccine booster — adults can lose immunity as they age

According to the city, whooping cough is a very contagious disease of the lungs and the throat.

“Whooping cough is spread from person to person as a result of coughing, especially in the first two weeks of infection,” according to the city’s release. “It primarily affects children less than seven years of age who do not have immunity through vaccination. Fully vaccinated children or adults can still get the infection due to decreased immunity over time, but if they do get infected they generally experience less severe illness with fewer complications.”

The city says anyone who would like more information about whooping cough (Pertussis) can call Public Health Services at 905-546-2063.

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