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Injured New Brunswick biker speaks out about motorcycle safety

Injured New Brunswick biker speaks out about motorcycle safety
WATCH: A Moncton man who spent months recovering from a severe motorcycle accident is calling on bikers to slow down this spring. Shelley Steeves brings us that story.

A Moncton man who spent months recovering from a severe motorcycle accident is calling on bikers to slow down this spring.

Joey Landry said that spring road conditions are dangerous and other drivers are often too distracted to even notice bikers on the road.

“There’s a lot of riders that are anxious to get on their bikes and this time of the year the roads are horrible. People are not looking out for bikers, so you got to be twice as careful,” said Landry.

He is asking bikers not to get too excited and forget about safety.

READ MORE: Edmonton motorcyclists reminded to keep noise levels down ahead of summer riding season

Landry said no one ever talks about or admits his or her limits when it comes to riding a motorcycle, especially around the custom bike shop where he works.

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“I liked speed,” said Landry, but his accident taught him to slow down.

Last fall, Landry lost control of his bike on a stretch of highway as he was heading too fast into an off-ramp. Landry said he hit some gravel and ended up flying over an overpass and into the woods.

“I hurt myself pretty bad. I shattered my shoulder blade, I broke some ribs and my knee and I got a concussion. I was very fortunate to make it out alive,” said Landry who added that just over a month ago one of his good friends died in a similar accident out west.

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He said speed kills, but so can distracted driving. He’s calling on drivers to watch out for bikers, especially now that the milder weather is moving in.

READ MORE: Man critically injured in early-morning motorcycle crash at Barrhaven intersection

“Stay off your phone. We see it more and more every year especially working in a bike shop you hear about it every day,” said Landry.

According to the NB RCMP’s annual report, there were 11 motorcycle fatalities in the province in 2017.

The figures for the 2018’s report is still being compiled.

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After months of going through rehabilitation therapy, Landry said he is grateful to be alive and to be back on his bike.  Only now, he’s using a little less throttle.

“It can happen to anyone. It doesn’t matter how much experience you have. Speed can kill.”

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