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Heat warnings announced as parts of Saskatchewan experience plus-30 temperatures

Click to play video: 'Heat warnings announced as parts of Saskatchewan experience plus-30 temperatures' Heat warnings announced as parts of Saskatchewan experience plus-30 temperatures
Saskatchewan communities experienced their first 30-degree day on Friday as temperatures are expected to reach the mid-thirties in some areas on Saturday – Jun 20, 2022

Areas of Saskatchewan were hit with a blast of summer heat on Friday as heat warnings were issued in the province before the start of the weekend.

Environment Canada placed heat warnings in western and southern regions of the province with communities such as Moose Jaw and Swift Current experiencing their first 30-degree day of the year.

“Heat warnings are issued when very high temperature or humidity conditions are expected to pose an elevated risk of heat illnesses, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion,” Environment Canada stated in its heat warning alert on Friday.

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It’s expected to be even hotter on Saturday as meteorologists are forecasting daytime highs in the mid-30s on Saturday across the province.

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In addition, humidex values are set to approach the 40-degree mark.

Environment Canada anticipates a return to normal temperatures by Sunday morning.

“It’s not a true heat wave but it’s definitely the first blast of heat we have had this season,” said Terri Lang, a meteorologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada.

“Humidex values will be creeping up (on Saturday). The more humid the air is, the harder it is for the body to cool off. Often it feels a lot hotter when there is humidity in the air because we have been getting so much rain as of late. It’s something to keep in your mind.”

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There are a few things to keep in mind if you plan to spend time in the sweltering sun this weekend.

Lang suggested seeking shade as much as possible, staying hydrated and avoiding the warmest times of the day in the afternoon.

Environment Canada also recommends watching for effects of heat illness, including swelling, rash, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heat stroke and the worsening of some health conditions, when heat warnings are in effect.

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