Advertisement

People buying up fireworks to fill gap of cancelled Canada Day celebrations in Saskatoon, Regina

Pelican Market in Saskatoon says it's seen more demand for fireworks this year compared to past Canada Days.
Pelican Market in Saskatoon says it's seen more demand for fireworks this year compared to past Canada Days. Gabriela Panza-Beltrandi/Global News

Many celebrations have had to adjust to the new normal amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The latest cancellation: Canada Day.

Read more: What you can and can’t do in Saskatoon on Canada Day

In Saskatoon, the usual celebrations at Diefenbaker Park are going virtual. People can tune in after 10 a.m. to the online celebration featuring Brett Kissel, Tucker Lane’s Leslie Stanwyck, and a number of Saskatchewan artists. It can be watched here.

Meanwhile, in Regina, Wascana Lake celebrations were cancelled in May.

With no public events, people are taking entertainment into their own hands, and some stores that sell fireworks say business is booming.

Story continues below advertisement

“Lots of my expensive boxes, about $200, already have sold out,” said a delighted Youwu Chen, manager of Pelican Market in Saskatoon.

Read more: Coronavirus: Scott Moe says reopen dates coming for nearly all businesses in Saskatchewan

His business is usually busy selling fireworks this time of year, but he said he’s noticed more people than ever stocking up. He said it’s likely Pelican Market will sell out Canada Day.

Other stores Global News spoke to also said they were much busier than this time last year.

Saskatoon’s fire department said fireworks are permitted on Canada Day, but there are restrictions.

People setting off fireworks must be over 18. They’re allowed to shoot off fireworks between dusk and 11 p.m. but cannot shoot them into or on public property, such as at city hall or in city parks.

The fire department said people must soak fireworks in water until they’re soaked through, about 15 minutes, before throwing them out.

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

Story continues below advertisement

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.

Brett Kissel serenades packed SaskTel Centre parking lot — three times
Brett Kissel serenades packed SaskTel Centre parking lot — three times