Advertisement

Coronavirus: Saskatchewan to offer financial support for workers helping most vulnerable

Saskatchewan to offer financial support for workers helping most vulnerable
WATCH: A wage supplement for low income essential workers has been announced by the Saskatchewan government.

The Saskatchewan government is providing temporary financial support to some workers helping vulnerable citizens during the coronavirus pandemic.

Salaries are being topped up by a cost-shared $400 per month for workers earning less than $2,500 per month.

READ MORE: ‘COVID-19 overload’: Saskatchewan nurses fight pandemic stress at work, home, union says

The new supplement applies to those working at senior-care facilities including private care homes, licensed child-care facilities, group homes run by community-based organizations along with emergency shelters and transition shelters.

It includes caregivers, cook and cleaners both full-time and part-time.

“Workers at these facilities have been helping many of Saskatchewan’s most vulnerable citizens get through the COVID-19 emergency,” Finance Minister Donna Harpauer said.

Story continues below advertisement
Coronavirus outbreak: Saskatchewan unveils temporary wage supplement for essential workers
Coronavirus outbreak: Saskatchewan unveils temporary wage supplement for essential workers

“This new wage supplement reflects how greatly we appreciate their ongoing efforts and dedication under challenging circumstances.”

The $400 supplement is being provided for 16 weeks, March 15 to July 4.

READ MORE: SHA to prepare field hospitals in Saskatoon, Regina for coronavirus patients

“Often family members help support their loved ones in facilities, but visitation restrictions have made that impossible, putting even more emphasis on the essential roles of these workers,” Harpauer said.

The province estimates 35,000 workers will eligible to receive the supplement wage and is expected to cost $56 million.

‘COVID-19 overload’: Saskatchewan nurses fight pandemic stress at work, home, union says
‘COVID-19 overload’: Saskatchewan nurses fight pandemic stress at work, home, union says
Story continues below advertisement

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Health officials caution against all international travel. Returning travellers are legally obligated to self-isolate for 14 days, beginning March 26, in case they develop symptoms and to prevent spreading the virus to others. Some provinces and territories have also implemented additional recommendations or enforcement measures to ensure those returning to the area self-isolate.

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.