Advertisement

Trudeau says relief for oil sector amid COVID-19 pandemic coming ‘shortly’

Click to play video: 'Coronavirus outbreak: Is Trudeau planning specific legislation to aid energy sector?' Coronavirus outbreak: Is Trudeau planning specific legislation to aid energy sector?
WATCH ABOVE: Speaking outside Rideau Cottage on Ottawa on Tuesday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said his government would "shortly" be uneviling legislation intended to aid those sectors of the economy hardest-hit by COVID-19, such as tourism, hospitality, and the energy sector. – Apr 14, 2020

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says more information on a financial aid package for the struggling oil and gas sector is coming, although a firm timeline still has yet to be released.

Earlier this month, Trudeau said his government was looking for a way to help. That promise came nine days after Finance Minister Bill Morneau said an aid package for the oil sector was “hours, potentially days” away.

READ MORE: Patience running short for federal energy industry aid, Alberta minister says

Trudeau was asked about the bailout again Tuesday morning, during his daily news conference regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We recognize that the most important thing from the very beginning was to get help out to Canadians right across the country, regardless of the sectors they’re in, regardless of their situation or their location,” the prime minister said.

Story continues below advertisement

“That’s why we put forward two extremely strong measures that help all workers across country — the Canada Emergency Response Benefit for people who have lost a paycheque and the Emergency Wage Subsidy so that people can keep their jobs and be ready to come back to work when the economy comes back.

“We will and we are looking at more specific sector-related relief and supports for those sectors that are hardest hit — whether it’s the tourism sector, the airline sector or the oil and gas industry or others — we will have more to say on that shortly.”

READ MORE: Feds torn between moving toward cleaner energy or bailing out oil and gas sector

Last week, several CEOs of companies involved in Canada’s oil and gas industry made a plea for financial help from the federal government through a letter published in the Financial Post.

The opinion piece, titled “An open letter to Canadians from oil and gas workers,” asked the prime minister to introduce a payroll relief plan.

“This is our SOS call to Canadians,” Mark Scholz, president and CEO of the Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors, said, adding any and all help is critical right now.

Click to play video: 'Oil and gas sector pens open letter to Canadians asking for financial help' Oil and gas sector pens open letter to Canadians asking for financial help
Oil and gas sector pens open letter to Canadians asking for financial help – Apr 6, 2020

Federal Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan said last week that the long-awaited bailout would contain measures to improve “liquidity” for Canada’s energy sector and is coming soon, but he also didn’t say when.

Story continues below advertisement

READ MORE: Patience running short for federal energy industry aid, Alberta minister says

On Sunday, OPEC, Russia and other oil-producing nations finalized an unprecedented production cut of nearly 10 million barrels, or a tenth of global supply, in hopes of boosting crashing prices amid the novel coronavirus pandemic and a price war.

Producers say Canadian oil wells will continue to be shut down amid weak global oil prices despite the agreement.

Click to play video: 'Alberta oil producers say more needs to be done to stabilize industry' Alberta oil producers say more needs to be done to stabilize industry
Alberta oil producers say more needs to be done to stabilize industry – Apr 13, 2020

The price of Western Canadian Select bitumen-blend oil rose by almost five per cent on Monday morning from Thursday’s close, but remained stuck below US$5 per barrel as U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate oil prices inched up by an equally modest amount.

Both oil prices drifted lower through the day on Monday and wound up in negative territory, with WTI down 35 cents at US$22.41 per barrel and WCS settling at US$3.96, down 43 cents or almost 10 per cent.

Story continues below advertisement

With files from The Canadian Press.

Sponsored content