May 22, 2019 9:15 am

City to consult public on lowering speed limits, signs off on Thames Valley Parkway trail project

A report about area speed limits that went before the civic works committee last week says it would cost $400,000 to manufacture and install speed-limit signage.

Matthew Trevithick / 980 CFPL File
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City politicians are giving staff the green light to organize public consultations on slowing traffic down in some of London’s residential areas.

Those meetings are expected to take place throughout the summer as part of an investigation into lowering speed limits below 50 km/h, hiking fines for speeding, and implementing photo radar systems.

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Stephen Turner, the councillor for Ward 11, told his colleagues on Tuesday that dubbing certain areas “community safety zones” and thereby paving the way for tougher driving rules, had already received “incredibly strong” support from constituents.

READ MORE: City committee considering connecting Thames Valley Parkway trail in London

“Councillors, we know quite well, how [many] inquiries we have about ‘How do I get traffic calming in my neighbourhood?’ and ‘How do I adjust the speed within the neighbourhood,'” he said.

“I’m glad we’re moving forward with some public participation.”

Ward 10 Coun. Paul Van Meerbergen says anything that can be done to reduce speed in residential neighbourhoods is a positive development.

“By the same token, raising the speed on the arterial roadway, that in and of itself will help in terms of cut through [traffic], which so many neighbourhoods suffer from.”

A report about area speed limits that went before the civic works committee last week says it would cost $400,000 to manufacture and install speed-limit signage. It didn’t say how much it would cost to install photo-radar systems in community safety and school zones, but Van Meerbergen did propose speed humps as a lower-tech, cheaper option instead.

READ MORE: Back to the River plan sparks tense debate at London city hall

Councillors also signed off on a contract that’ll connect the north part of the Thames Valley Parkway between Ross Park and the North London athletic fields. J-AAR Excavating is getting $6.2 million to close the gap.

Construction could start this year, with the trail useable by the fall of 2020.

The full cost of the project, including design, administration and an architectural study, is $7.5 million. The Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling program will cover $3.3 million of the cost.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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