Advertisement

Man photographed with Mayor Rob Ford seeking release of videos for defence

U.S. website Gawker was first to publish this image of Mayor Rob Ford with three men. Screenshot / Gawker

TORONTO – The video that appears to show Toronto Mayor Rob Ford smoking crack cocaine may see the light of day.

The lawyer of a man photographed with the mayor outside a house reportedly associated with the video of Ford is going to court Friday to get two media files released.

Toronto police said the videos were on hard drives that were seized in June during a gangs and guns investigation called Project Traveller that led to charges against Mohammad Khattak.

Lawyer Daniel Brown argues the video files are “relevant disclosure” which may help Khattak defend himself on the charges he faces.

READ MORE: When will the public get to see the Rob Ford video?

Ford has said he would like to see the video himself and has publicly asked for it to be released.

Story continues below advertisement

Brown said that if Ford “truly wishes to see himself on that video,” he can join the application.

The mayor admitted on Tuesday of having smoked crack cocaine in the past while he was in office. He also said he won’t resign and continue to work “for the sake of the taxpayers.”

READ MORE: Mayor Rob Ford won’t resign after crack cocaine admission

Meanwhile, Ford faces mounting pressure from his colleagues at city hall to step down or take a leave of absence. A motion to weaken Ford’s position is also in the works.

“My first reaction [to Ford’s crack cocaine admission] was ‘Wow.’ I was quite surprised. It is very disappointing to have the mayor of this city of Toronto admit to smoking crack cocaine,” Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong told reporters Tuesday afternoon.

A spokeswoman for Toronto police wouldn’t say how Ford’s comments would impact an ongoing police investigation related to the mayor’s friend and occasional driver, Alexander “Sandro” Lisi, saying only that “the information will be passed on to investigators.”

Story continues below advertisement

-with files from The Canadian Press

Sponsored content