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Weekly survey: Does music give you chills? (And be honest.)

Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco, have developed a way to turn signals from the brain into speech.
Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco, have developed a way to turn signals from the brain into speech. Science Photo Library / Getty Images Plus

Last week, there was a story out of USC’s Brain and Creativity Institute on how music gives some people–repeat, some people–chills.

People who get musical shivers apparently have more fibers connecting the auditory cortex–the place in the brain that processes sound–to those parts of the brain that deal with processing emotions. More fibers equals better communication. And better communication allows music and emotions to mingle more freely.

But not everyone is wired this way. This isn’t a defect or shortcoming; it’s just how some brains work.

So here’s the question: Do you get the chills from music?

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