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Some Nova Scotia political leaders ready to campaign in federal election

WATCH: At least one party in Nova Scotia appears to be making a conscious decision to distance itself from the leader of its federal counterpart amid the ongoing election. As Jeremy Keefe reports, Tim Houston won’t commit to campaigning with federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer.

It’s election season, and three things are inevitable: death, taxes and provincial political parties helping their federal counterparts.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil said he’s more than happy to go out and “do some work” for some of the federal Liberal candidates who want him, while Nova Scotia NDP Leader Gary Burrill told Global News he will use “every spare nanosecond” to campaign with prospective NDP MPs.

“In the NDP, the provincial and federal parties work very closely together,” Burrill said. “I am so excited about the stature and the quality of the slate that our party is bringing forward in our province and I’m looking forward to going door to door with them.”

But for at least one party in Nova Scotia, there appears to be a conscious decision to distance its members from the leader of its federal counterpart.

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READ MORE: Here’s where Canada’s party leaders will be on Day 3 of the election campaign

Despite the success of the Conservative Party of Canada this federal term — in which New Brunswick, P.E.I., Ontario, Quebec and B.C. opted out of giving their Liberal governments another term — Nova Scotia PC Leader Tim Houston would not commit to going to bat for Andrew Scheer.

A statement from the provincial party said Houston is “totally focused” on the provincial legislature, his riding of Pictou East, and winning an upcoming provincial byelection, leaving him limited availability to campaign on the federal stage.

But Houston says he’s committed to attending community events with federal candidates George Canyon and Scott Armstrong, both of whom are friends he supports.

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It’s a stark contrast to the sentiments expressed by other provincial leaders.

“I believe our relationship with the prime minister has been positive. We have signed a number of positive deals with them,” McNeil said.

“I continue to provide that working relationship and I will continue to do what I can.”

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It’s unclear when federal leaders will arrive in Nova Scotia, but with all parties in full campaign mode, it’s safe to say they will visit at some point.

WATCH: ‘Fringe parties’ preparing for upcoming election

“Fringe parties” preparing for upcoming election
“Fringe parties” preparing for upcoming election