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Dogsledding Santa, 48-year-old christmas gift: A look at some holiday headlines

Click to play video: 'A look at some Canadian festive headlines from 2018' A look at some Canadian festive headlines from 2018
WATCH ABOVE: With Christmas just four days away, Global News' Farah Nasser and Alan Carter take a look at some holiday headlines that happened in 2018 – Dec 21, 2018

The holiday spirit is alive, and with four days left until Christmas, Global News wants to revisit stories that embody the feeling of the holidays.

The Christmas that came, 48 years later

It’s a story that garnered international attention.

For 48 years, an Edmonton man placed a present wrapped in shiny blue, dog-eared paper under the Christmas tree — but he never opened it.

WATCH ABOVE: It’s been a mystery for nearly 50 years but on Thursday night, the wait was over. An Edmonton man finally opened a 48-year-old Christmas gift from the girl who dumped him and she was there for the occasion.
Click to play video: '48-year-old Christmas gift from girl who dumped man finally opened' 48-year-old Christmas gift from girl who dumped man finally opened
48-year-old Christmas gift from girl who dumped man finally opened – Dec 7, 2018

The gift was from Adrian Pearce’s ex-girlfriend and it was given to him in 1971 when Pearce was a 17-year-old Grade 12 student at George S. Henry Secondary School in the Toronto suburb of Don Mills.

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READ MORE: 48-year-old Christmas gift from girl who dumped Edmonton man to finally be opened

Vicky Allen — Pearce’s first serious girlfriend — broke up with him. But during the breakup, she gave Pearce a present. He took it home and threw it under his family’s tree and it’s been left under the Christmas tree for almost five decades.

READ MORE: Woman opens Christmas gift she gave to boyfriend when she dumped him in 1971

On Dec. 7, the gift was finally opened. Pearce and Allen reunited to open the present, and inside, a small book called “Love Is: New Ways To Spot That Certain Feeling” with a cartoons and sayings about love.

Fake or Fir? Christmas Tree shortage in Canada

Each year, people look forward to picking out the perfect fresh Christmas tree to be the centre of the holiday festivities, but 2018 has proven to be a difficult year for the harvest.

 WATCH: Bad harvest has merchants fearing looming Christmas tree shortage for Quebec
Click to play video: 'Bad harvest has merchants fearing looming Christmas tree shortage for Quebec' Bad harvest has merchants fearing looming Christmas tree shortage for Quebec
Bad harvest has merchants fearing looming Christmas tree shortage for Quebec – Nov 30, 2018

Thousands of Fraser and balsam firs big and small are up for sale but merchants worry they won’t have enough for everyone after a difficult harvest and increased sales across the border.

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READ MORE: Bad harvest has merchants fearing looming Christmas tree shortage for Quebec

Several Christmas tree vendors in Toronto are urging people to hurry if they are looking to by a fresh tree, otherwise it might be too late and they’ll be forced to buy fake.

Dogsledding Santa

In Salisbury, N.B., the perfect winter weather conditions meant a dream come true for Doug Stoakley.

WATCH: Most of us cringe when the weather forecast calls for loads of snow. But one New Brunswick man has been waiting for the white stuff, and so has his team of dogs. Shelley Steeves reports.
Click to play video: 'Moncton man and dog sled team harness Christmas cheer' Moncton man and dog sled team harness Christmas cheer
Moncton man and dog sled team harness Christmas cheer – Dec 19, 2018

Stoakley said for six years he has been dreaming of riding his dogsled team through the village dressed as Santa’s “helper.”  This season, he finally had enough snow to follow through on his wish.

READ MORE: Dogsledding Santa spreads Christmas cheer in New Brunswick village

Dressed up as Santa Clause, Stoakley took his labs for a ride around Salisbury, spreading a little Christmas cheer to those people in his community.

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– With files from Karen Bartko, Shelley Steeves, Brayden Haines and The Canadian Press.

 

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