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Controversial law that allows revocation of Canadian citizenship goes into effect

Prime Minister Stephen Harper answers a question during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday, May 28, 2015. .
Prime Minister Stephen Harper answers a question during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday, May 28, 2015. . THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

TORONTO – The Federal government says it now has the power to revoke the citizenship of some Canadians convicted of terrorism, treason or espionage.

A controversial new law, first introduced last June, went into effect on Friday.

The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration says there are several serious crimes that could result in dual citizens losing their Canadian status.

The ministry says it would revoke citizenship for anyone found guilty of terrorism, treason and high treason, and spying for a foreign government.

The rules would also apply to dual citizens who take up arms against Canada by fighting in a foreign army or joining an international terrorist organization.

The new law has met with strong public criticism, and two Ontario lawyers have already launched a court case arguing it is unconstitutional.

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