Advertisement

Quebec won’t take day off for Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral, Legault says

Click to play video: 'Trudeau announces Canada will get national holiday to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s death'
Trudeau announces Canada will get national holiday to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s death
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Tuesday that Canada will mark the death of Queen Elizabeth II with a national day of mourning on Sept. 19. The national holiday will coincide with the queen’s funeral in London, U.K. “Declaring an opportunity for Canadians to mourn on Monday is going to be important,” he said. – Sep 13, 2022

Quebec Premier François Legault was quick to react to the news that Canada will hold a national holiday to mark the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

When asked by the reporters on the campaign trail for the upcoming provincial election on Oct. 3, Legault said Quebec will hold a commemoration day but there won’t be a holiday.

“I will continue the campaign,” Legault said in Montreal’s Verdun borough.

Legault offered more details about his decision when speaking at Montreal city hall later in the day, following a meeting with mayor Valérie Plante.

“First I think about the students and I wouldn’t like them to miss school, we’ve had enough with the pandemic. I think it’s not a good idea to close schools or put parents in a position where they wouldn’t be able to work,” Legault explained.

Story continues below advertisement

The national holiday will coincide with the queen’s funeral in London, U.K., scheduled to take place Monday, Sept. 19.

“Declaring an opportunity for Canadians to mourn on Monday is important,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Tuesday, adding conversations are underway with provinces and federal workers.

Read more: Canada announces a national holiday to mark Queen Elizabeth’s death

Read next: ‘It is hell on earth’: Federal Conservative leader on how B.C. is managing its drug crisis

In the days after the queen’s death, Legault has faced criticism from the Parti Québécois for lowering flags on public buildings to half-mast to honour the queen’s life.

“Although I also offer my condolences to the family, I object to the Quebec nation lowering its flag,” said Parti Québécois leader Paul St-Pierre Plamondon in a tweet. “Legault should not treat the Queen of England as head of the Quebec state, nor give credibility to an illegitimate British colonial regime in Quebec.”

The monarch’s passing has also raised questions about whether the province should keep the position of lieutenant governor.

Read more: In Quebec, the Queen’s death raises questions about future of the monarchy in Canada

Read next: Canada’s designated COVID-19 quarantine facilities cost nearly $389M over 3 years: PHAC

Quebecers have a complicated relationship with the British monarchy.

During a 1964 visit, the monarch was welcomed by a riot in Quebec City that has become known as “Truncheon Saturday.”

Story continues below advertisement

As it stands now, only federally regulated workers will get the day off to mourn the death of the queen, that includes federal workers in Quebec.

— with files from Global’s Eric Stober, Amanda Connolly and The Canadian Press 

Sponsored content