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‘The work is impressive. We get it’: B.C. ministry warns drivers about stopping on Coquihalla

Click to play video: 'Warning to drivers taking photos on Coquihalla Highway' Warning to drivers taking photos on Coquihalla Highway
The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is sending out a warning to drivers along the Coquihalla Highway. The ministry says there's been several reports of people stopping to take pictures of the flood damage – Jan 20, 2022

The B.C. Transportation Ministry is sending out a warning to drivers along the Coquihalla Highway.

The ministry says it has received several reports of people stopping to take pictures of the flood damage.

In the tweet, the ministry said, “The work is impressive. We get it. But you’re putting yourselves and others in harm’s way.”

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The highway opened to regular vehicle traffic Wednesday for the first time following the catastrophic damage of the highway during the atmospheric rivers in November.

More snow is forecast to hit the highway on Thursday and drivers are being warned to drive to the conditions.

Click to play video: 'Coquihalla Highway reopens to general public' Coquihalla Highway reopens to general public
Coquihalla Highway reopens to general public – Jan 19, 2022

Read more: .C.’s storm-ravaged Coquihalla Highway reopens to the public

While the road was open to the public Wednesday, it remains an active worksite with significant repairs still needed.

READ MORE: Months after disastrous floods, B.C.’s Coquihalla Highway to fully reopen Wednesday

“A lot of construction involved, a lot of single-lane track, a lot of potholes, the conditions of the road weren’t that good. You can’t pass,” Tony Allen told Global News after driving the route.

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“You get stuck behind a big truck and it’s a slow go.”

More than 300 workers have continued working to implement temporary repairs which will allow the continued movement of goods and people while the Ministry of Transportation plans permanent repairs and upgrades to protect against future storms.

— with files from Simon Little

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