Advertisement

Ontario invests $4.2M to boost staffing at long-term care homes in Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock

Caressant Care in Lindsay is among a number of long-term care homes receiving funding to increase staffing, the Ontario government announced Friday. Caressant Care

Long-term care homes in the riding of Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock will share in nearly $4.2 million of Ontario funding, the area’s MPP announced Friday.

According to Progressive Conservative MPP Laurie Scott, 14 long-term care homes in her riding will receive financial support to increase staffing levels, aiming to ensure residents receive — on average — four hours of direct care. It’s part of a $270-million commitment in 2021-2022 by the government to reach the goal by 2024-25.

“This funding will allow long-term care homes in our community to hire additional staff so they can provide a better quality of care to local residents,” stated Scott. “This is part of our government’s plan to train, hire, and retain thousands of new staff over the next four years.”

Read more: Ontario announces funds to hire more than 4,000 long-term care workers

Story continues below advertisement

The $4,199,774 in total funding will be allocated to the following long-term care homes for additional staffing for direct care for residents:

City of Kawartha Lakes

  • Victoria Manor Home for the Aged in Lindsay: $591,316. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $3,621,732 annually more than their current funding.
  • Caressant Care Nursing and Retirement Home in Lindsay: $434,584. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $2,661,756 annually more than their current funding.
  • Caressant Care on McLaughlin Road in Lindsay: $341,965. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $2,094,504 annually more than their current funding.
  • Extendicare – Kawartha Lakes in Lindsay: $227,978. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $1,396,332 annually more than their current funding.
  • Frost Manor in Lindsay $170,985. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $1,047,252 annually more than their current funding.
  • Case Manor Care Community in Bobcaygeon: $341,965. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $2,094,504 annually more than their current funding.
  • Fenelon Court in Fenelon Falls: $238,665. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $1,461,780 annually more than their current funding.

Minden, Haliburton

  • Hyland Crest Senior Citizens Home in Minden: $220,852. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $1,352,700 annually more than their current funding.
  • Highland Wood in Haliburton: $106,861. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $654,528 annually more than their current funding.
  • Extendicare in Haliburton: $156,738. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $959,976 annually more than their current funding.

Cavan-Monaghan Township

  • Springdale County Manor: $242,225. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $1,483,596 annually more than their current funding.
  • Centennial Place in Millbrook: $455,957. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $2,792,664 annually more than their current funding.

Brock

  • Lakeview Manor in Beaverton: $530,758. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $3,250,824 annually more than their current funding.
  • Bon Air Long-Term Care Residence in Cannington: $138,925. By the year 2024-2025, the home will receive $850,896 annually more than their current funding.

The government says Ontario residents in long-term care homes currently receive an average of two hours and 45 minutes of direct care from nurses and personal support workers. The $270 million in new funding for 2021-22 aims to increase the daily average to three hours per resident per day by the end of this fiscal year.

Story continues below advertisement

“We know that more qualified staff means more daily care for residents,” stated Rod Phillips, Minister of Long-Term Care. “Hiring more staff is part of our government’s plan to fix long-term care and to improve the quality of care residents receive and the quality of life they experience.”

Sponsored content