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Civil rights group says N.B. must let Indigenous students from Quebec into province

Click to play video: 'Sugarloaf High School reopens after positive case of COVID-19 confirmed last week' Sugarloaf High School reopens after positive case of COVID-19 confirmed last week
The school in Campbellton was closed for cleaning and contact tracing, but as classes resume students from Quebec who attend the school are not being allowed back. Callum Smith has more. – Oct 15, 2020

A civil rights group is calling on New Brunswick to allow Indigenous students living in a Quebec border region to cross into the province to go to school.

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association said today in a news release New Brunswick’s COVID-19 order singles out First Nations students and opens the province to accusations of racial discrimination.

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For weeks, the Listuguj First Nation has been wondering why about 100 of its students can no longer cross a bridge into Campbellton, N.B., to attend classes at Sugarloaf Senior High.

New Brunswick issued an emergency order in October prohibiting unnecessary travel into the Campbellton area following COVID-19 outbreaks in the region.

Click to play video: 'New Brunswick First Nations offer support for N.S. moderate livelihood fishers' New Brunswick First Nations offer support for N.S. moderate livelihood fishers
New Brunswick First Nations offer support for N.S. moderate livelihood fishers – Oct 26, 2020

The CCLA says staff members from Listuguj First Nation are able to cross the border to work but students from the same school are not.

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The Toronto-based group says it has written to the province’s justice minister, Hugh J. Flemming, in protest of what it says is the unlawful treatment of the Indigenous high school students.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 10, 2020.

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This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

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