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Explosion, fire at Stoney Creek Airport: Hamilton police

Hamilton Fire says 15 to 18 vehicles were inside a building that caught fire at 684 Mud Street E. in Stoney Creek.
Hamilton Fire says 15 to 18 vehicles were inside a building that caught fire at 684 Mud Street E. in Stoney Creek. Don Mitchell / Global News

Hamilton Fire says a number of vehicles sustained “significant damage” after a “well-involved fire” at a metal hanger at the Stoney Creek Airport.

Fire Chief Dave Cunliffe told Global News that around two-dozen units were called out to a structure fire at 684 Mud St. E. just after 1:30 p.m. on Friday.

Cunliffe said there was at least one explosion that might have been attributed to one or more cars.

“Two people were inside the building when the fire started who said they heard a noise from the oil furnace,” said Cunliffe. “They tried to put the fire out with extinguishers but were not successful.”

READ MORE: Multiple-alarm fire in Ancaster causes $1.5M in damage

Cunliffe said there were about 15 to 18 cars in the hanger with six other cars parked outside that sustained “significant damage.”

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Hamilton Police closed off a portion of Mud Street East between Sixth and Seventh roads during a hanger fire at the Stoney Creek Airport.
Hamilton Police closed off a portion of Mud Street East between Sixth and Seventh roads during a hanger fire at the Stoney Creek Airport. Don Mitchell / Global News

“It was a metal-clad building at a rural area where there are no hydrants so tankers had to be sent,” Cunliffe said. “It’s a total loss of the building.
There are no damage estimates at this time.”

No other buildings adjacent to the fire were impacted, according to Hamilton Fire.

There’s no word as to how the fire started. No injuries were reported.

The office of the fire marshal has been notified.

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Photos on social media showed a huge plume of black smoke emanating from the airport.

Police asked residents to stay out of the area at the time of the apparent explosion.