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Montrealers stand in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en

Protesters rally near Parc metro station in Montreal on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020. .
Protesters rally near Parc metro station in Montreal on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2020. . Sebastien Gagnon Dorval / Global News

Protesters rallied on Sunday in front of Parc metro station to gather in solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en Nation of northern British Columbia and their fight against the Coastal GasLink pipeline project.

Montrealers at the rally peacefully held up signs and banners reading, “Land back!”, “Solidarity with Wet’suwet’en”, “No access without consent” and “No pipelines on Wet’suwet’en territory”.

Coastal GasLink posted a 72-hour notice on Jan. 7 related to a B.C. Supreme Court injunction ordering pipeline opponents to clear the way towards a critical work site.

Wet’suwet’en activists say the order has no authority, and that under Wet’suwet’en law, only hereditary chiefs can give consent to the $6.6-billion project that would connect gas fields in northeastern B.C. with the planned LNG Canada export plant in Kitimat.

READ MORE: Feds to avoid selling Trans Mountain pipeline so long as risks remain

The company obtained approvals from the Wet’suwet’en’s 20 elected band councils, who stand to be financially compensated from the project. The provincial and federal governments have also signed off.

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Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs are asking to have a conversation with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and B.C. Premier John Horgan to discuss the plans for the pipeline set to run through their land.

READ MORE: B.C. Indigenous pipeline opponents stage rallies as clock ticks on injunction order

“This is what we’re asking today,” said Wet’suwet’en member Marlene Hale. “Please give us the voice that we have. Do the right thing, come out and speak at the table with our people.”

Elders from the Kahnawake and Kanehsatà:ke Nations joined the protest and stood in solidarity with Hale as she shared her nation’s pain with those who opened their ears to listen.

— With files from Global’s Sarah MacDonald and Sean Boynton