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Ariana Grande settles ‘God Is a Woman’ copyright lawsuit

WATCH: Ariana Grande's official 'God is a Woman' music video

The lawsuit filed against Ariana Grande, for alleged copyright infringement in her God is a Woman music video, by Russian artist Vladimir Kush earlier this year has reportedly been dropped.

Back in February, the 25-year-old star was sued along with her record label, Universal Music Group (UMG), and director Dave Meyers of Freenjoy Inc.

Kush, 54, claimed that without permission, Grande used one of his most popular paintings, The Candle (1998), in the smash-hit music video.

A still capture from Ariana Grande’s ‘God is a Woman’ music video. She was sued by artist Vladimir Kush for using the likeness of his painting, ‘Candle’ in this shot.
A still capture from Ariana Grande’s ‘God is a Woman’ music video. She was sued by artist Vladimir Kush for using the likeness of his painting, ‘Candle’ in this shot. Republic Records/UMG

However, according to Pitchfork, the lawsuit was settled last week in a Nevada federal court.

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The 2018 video depicts Grande’s silhouette as a candlewick. She sits atop a candle which is surrounded by a colourful night’s sky and an abundance of clouds.

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This specific scene appears three times respectively in the God is a Woman music video.

Ariana Grande in the music video for ‘Boyfriend.’
Ariana Grande in the music video for ‘Boyfriend.’ YouTube / Republic Records

As reported by Billboard, Kush claimed in the suit that the Thank U, Next singer copied not only the entire colour palette of Candle, but another, very similar painting of his, Candle 2.

The artist further elaborated on what he suggested was copyright infringement in a lengthy Facebook post.

He wrote: “Despite the inconsequential changes and the appearance of the singer’s silhouette as the wick, the image is unmistakably taken without permission.”

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Official court papers found by Pitchfork revealed that after coming to an undisclosed mutual agreement, Kush agreed to dismiss his claims against Grande, UMG and Meyers.

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In this handout provided by ‘One Love Manchester’ benefit concert Ariana Grande performs on stage on June 4, 2017 in Manchester, England.
In this handout provided by ‘One Love Manchester’ benefit concert Ariana Grande performs on stage on June 4, 2017 in Manchester, England. Getty Images/Dave Hogan for One Love Manchester

After reaching out to Grande’s attorney, Lincoln Bandlow, Billboard reported that “The matter was settled to the satisfaction of all the parties.”

Global News has reached out to a representative of UMG seeking further comment.

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