Advertisement

2019 Canada election results: Incumbent Liberal candidate Sean Fraser won the Central Nova riding

Voters in Central Nova elected Sean Fraser of the Liberal party as their MP in the 2019 election.

Incumbent Liberal MP Sean Fraser was set to go against a high profile Tory candidate to maintain the momentum of the 2015 red wave that took him to parliament.

Fraser won the seat for the Liberals after incumbent Conservative MP Peter MacKay — who had represented Central Nova since 2004 — chose to not re-offer in the 2015 election.

Fraser’s biggest challenge was likely to come from well-known country music star George Canyon. Canyon replaced existing Tory candidate Roger MacKay who dropped out for “personal reasons.”

Canyon’s candidacy was a sure sign that the Conservatives was hoping to recapture Central Nova.

Candidates

Liberal: Sean Fraser (Incumbent)

Conservative: George Canyon

NDP: Betsy MacDonald

Green: Barry Randle

PPC: Al Muir

Independent: Michael Slowik

Communist Party: Chris Frazer

Global News is featuring the candidates for all parties running candidates in the upcoming 2019 general election. For a complete list of candidates, visit Elections Canada. 

Story continues below advertisement

Geography

Located in northern Nova Scotia this riding stretches from Antigonish in the northeast to the west past Pictou.

More geographical information on the electoral district can be found at Elections Canada. 

History

This riding was used by Brian Mulroney to gain a seat in the House of Commons after winning the PC Leadership in 1983. Mulroney would go on to become Prime Minister.

Elmer MacKay, the man who resigned his Central Nova seat in 1983 to create an opening for Mulroney, was re-elected to his seat in the 1984 election.

Elmer MacKay’s son Peter MacKay would end up taking the seat in 2004 and becoming the a co-founder of the new Conservative Party of Canada with former Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Elizabeth May, the leader of the Green Party is from the area and ran against Peter MacKay in 2011. She came in second, losing by almost 8 percentage points.

Sponsored content