May 10, 2019 5:51 pm
Updated: May 11, 2019 6:21 am

Speed limit boost in store for Hwy. 402 between London and Sarnia

A stretch of Highway 402, just outside of London, Ont.

Anika Vanderhelm / 980 CFPL listener
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Londoners can expect slightly faster commutes to Sarnia this fall.

The Doug Ford government announced Friday that it would be raising speed limits on sections of three Ontario 400-series highways.

READ MORE: London city hall to consider lowering residential speed limits to 40 km/h

The increases are part of a two-year pilot program that would see the speed limit of Highway 402 raised to 110 km/h between London and Sarnia.

Similar bumps would also be implemented on Highway 417 from Ottawa/Gloucester to Ontario/Quebec border and the Queen’s Elizabeth Way (QEW) between Hamilton and St. Catharines.

The increases are part of a two-year pilot program that would see the speed limit of Highway 402 raised to 110 km/h between London and Sarnia.

Minister of Transportation in Ontario

Explaining the move to Global News Radio 980 CFPL, Minister of Transportation Jeff Yurek mentioned provinces such as Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan who all share maximum highway speed limits of 110 km/h.

“It’s been over 40 years since we’ve done a review, so we thought let’s do a review, let’s do a pilot and see if it’s time Ontario ups the speed a little bit to get in line with other jurisdictions,” Yurek said.

LISTEN: Global News Radio’s Mike Stubbs talks with Transportation Minister Jeff Yurek on news speed limit pilot project 

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Yurek added that the increase will help keep drivers at the same speed.

“Right now, we have the 100 km/h speed limit, but some people are driving 120 km/h, some are driving 130 km/h and the odd person’s even higher,” Yurek said.

“That differential really can cause issues… people being frustrated end up passing on the right, et cetera.”

READ MORE: School bus camera footage alone to be enough to prosecute drivers in court

The selected highways were chosen for how easily they could be upgraded, according to Yurek.

“The interchange spacing between is three kilometres or higher and the roads are constructed to handle that speed safely… they’re [some] of the most safest roads we have.”

While speed limits will see a boost, street racing penalties will still be applied to drivers going 150 km/h.

An additional stretch of a yet-to-be-identified Northern Ontario highway will also be adjusted. The higher limits are expected to arrive in mid-September with consultations beginning in a few weeks.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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