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Regina store captures history with national letter writing campaign

Click to play video: 'Regina store captures history with national letter writing campaign' Regina store captures history with national letter writing campaign
WATCH: Putting pen to paper has become somewhat of a dying art in the digital era, but a group of letter writers in Regina are trying to change that. – Apr 8, 2019

Putting pen to paper has become somewhat of a dying art in the digital era, but a group of letter writers in Regina are trying to change that.

The owners of Paper Umbrella are challenging local residents to write 30 letters in 30 days for National Letter Writing Month in April.

“You hear so many people just telling their stories and their connections to people through letter writing,” said co-owner Brad Kreutzer.

READ MORE: Help preserve history by writing letters says Royal BC Museum

The art of communication has slowly shifted online through text messages, email and social media.

Theresa Kutarna, co-owner of Paper Umbrella, says handwritten notes and letters can help capture history.

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“Letters, in general, can document the time that you’re living in,” Kutarna said. “Then the letters become interesting to your children and your ancestors.”

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The Civic Museum of Regina has donated hundreds of vintage postcards to the stationary store for the campaign.

Some of the images on the postcards include scenes of the Queen City throughout the 1900s.

“You’re contributing to cultural heritage when you learn how to write a letter or if you are continuing the art of letter writing,” said Gillian Barker, Civic Museum of Regina.

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Kutarna believes every word and sentence is sharing a small part of history while also offering a chance to re-connect.

“I think it’s exceptionally important to bring back that personal experience and to own your own thoughts and ideas through your handwriting,” Kutarna said.

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