March 14, 2019 6:51 pm
Updated: March 14, 2019 8:57 pm

‘Edmonton Matters’: Mayor wants you to push city issues on provincial politicians

WATCH ABOVE: Edmonton's mayor want to see additional funding for the city from the provincial government become an election issue. As Kendra Slugoski reports, he's calling on Edmontonians to help make that happen.

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Edmonton’s mayor won’t say which provincial political party would benefit the city’s future, but he does have a list of what he thinks Edmontonians should ask candidates when they arrive on your doorstep ahead of the spring election.

“This is less about city hall telling and more about us inviting Edmontonians to speak for themselves,” said Iveson.


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Standing in front of a colourful backdrop, Iveson launched the “ask about Edmonton” campaign, with a website detailing how funding from senior levels of government is critical to city projects.

About 40 per cent of Edmonton’s infrastructure budget comes from other levels of government. The city points to its recently approved four-year capital budget of $4.3 billion — of that, $1.2 billion comes from the province.

READ MORE: Council settles on 2.6% Edmonton property tax increase for next 4 years

Iveson called on taxpayers to question candidates on how Edmonton will get its “fair share” of revenue for much-needed projects like fire stations, roads and rec centres.

While the mayor said funding for affordable housing has improved over the years, it is still not enough. He estimated more than $1 billion will be needed over the next five years, and said the city set aside $140 million for its part.

“The provincial and federal governments have announced lots of money. We need to see it mobilized to Edmonton and get in the ground.”

Last month, in advance of the provincial budget yet to be tabled, the city sent Finance Minister Joe Ceci a list of future funding requests.

READ MORE: Mayor Don Iveson submits wish list for Edmonton ahead of provincial, federal budgets

In December 2018, The City Charters Fiscal Framework Act was passed by the province to provide more predictable funding for Edmonton and Calgary.

The new funding approach would begin in 2022.

The mayor said he wants to hear clearly from all political parties on whether or not they share that same commitment to that legislation.

“It’s important for the next government to know that Edmonton matters,” said Iveson, “and this city is essential to Alberta’s long-term prosperity.”

The campaign is also urging social media users to tagline and hashtag with #askaboutyeg.

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