February 26, 2019 12:17 am
Updated: February 26, 2019 12:01 pm

Conservative Scot Davidson wins York-Simcoe federal byelection

WATCH: Conservative candidate Scot Davidson wins in federal byelection

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The people have cast their ballots and once again, the riding of York-Simcoe remains in the hands of the Tories.

Conservative Party of Canada candidate, Scot Davidson, has won the York-Simcoe riding.

Davidson defeated eight other candidates, including Liberal candidate Shaun Tanaka, NDP candidate Jessa McLean and Green Party candidate Mathew Lund to secure the York-Simcoe seat for the Tories during Monday evening’s federal byelection.

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With 100 of 136 polls reporting, Davidson captured over 50 per cent of the votes, while Liberal candidate Tanaka got just over 30 per cent. NDP candidate McLean received just over seven per cent of the vote.

READ MORE: Trudeau calls 3 byelections, including for seat NDP’s Jagmeet Singh seeks

York-Simcoe was one of three byelections Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced back in January.

The seat was left vacant after former Government House Leader, Peter Van Loan retired from politics in Sept. 2018.

Van Loan was first elected in the riding of York-Simcoe in 2004, and held the seat until he retired.

READ MORE: Peter Van Loan, former House Leader under Stephen Harper, retiring from politics

In 2006 Van Loan became a cabinet minister and held portfolios in international trade, public safety, intergovernmental affairs and sports. However, the majority of his time was spent as House Leader.

Van Loan remained in Harper’s inner circle, until the Conservatives were defeated by the Liberals in the 2015 federal election.

Davidson’s victory Monday evening has once again solidified the riding of York-Simcoe as a stronghold for the Tories.

Two other byelections were held Monday evening in Burnaby South, B.C., and Outremont, Que.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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