June 9, 2017 10:21 am
Updated: June 9, 2017 11:27 am

University of Saskatchewan staff keeping Roughriders fed

WATCH ABOVE: Staff at the University of Saskatchewan are keeping players fed as the Roughriders go through two-a-day workouts. Claire Hanna looks at the fuel that keeps the players going.

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You can’t win many games on an empty stomach, and football players have some pretty voracious appetites.

As the Saskatchewan Roughriders go through their paces on the field at training camp, University of Saskatchewan staff are busy keeping the hungry players fed.

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“Compared to what we would forecast for the average person, we probably go through about one-and-a-half times the amount of food, because they do eat a little bit more,” James McFarland, the executive chef at the university, said.

The Riders want their players to consume over 3,000 calories daily, over double what the average person needs.

The trick is getting them to eat.

“When you’re going in two-a-days, guys don’t want to eat, so you got to hover over them, keep an eye on them, make sure they’re at least eating something,” said Clint Spencer, the Riders strength and conditioning coach.

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So who are the big eaters on the team?

“A lot of people would think the O-lineman but I’d say the more streamline guys like the receivers and DB’s eat quite a bit,” Spencer said.

While staples like steak and ribs have been on the menu, there is one item O-lineman Jarriel King would like to see.

“Ice cream mixed with cake and pie,” King said.

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The Riders hit the turf at Mosaic Stadium on Saturday when they take on the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in pre-season action.

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