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Evidence phase finishes in trial of Saskatoon Hells Angels member

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WATCH ABOVE: The evidence phase in the drug trafficking trial of a Saskatoon Hells Angels member is now complete. As Joel Senick reports, a judge will decide in the new year whether or not Robert Allen fabricated his connection to cocaine suppliers – Dec 8, 2016

The evidence phase in the drug trafficking trial of a Saskatoon Hells Angels member is now complete and a judge will have to decide in the new year whether or not the accused fabricated his connection to cocaine suppliers.

Robert Allen, 36, is facing drug trafficking charges stemming from January 2015’s Project Forseti investigation. The Crown is alleging that Allen offered cocaine to former drug dealer Noel Harder, who was working as a police agent.

READ MORE: Saskatoon Hells Angels member says he fabricated drug connection

The transaction never happened, however Crown prosecutor Doug Curliss said a person can still be charged for offering to facilitate a deal.

“The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act says that it’s an offence to offer to do any of those things,” Curliss said to reporters Thursday.

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According to testimony, Harder met Allen in 2013 and began supplying him oxycontin to deal with back pain. Harder became a police informant the next year, after he was caught transporting guns.

According to secret recordings played this week in court, the two discussed a potential cocaine transaction through suppliers that Allen knew in eastern Canada. The conversations spanned roughly nine months, according to testimony.

Allen testified that he did discuss the transaction, but never intended to supply Harder with cocaine. He was able to personally tell his side of story, since defence lawyer Morris Bodnar had Allen take the stand.

“I knew I had to do it, as much as I don’t like doing it,” Bodnar said about the decision.

READ MORE: Fake oxycontin seized in Saskatchewan, Alberta police raids

Allen testified that he never had connections to drug suppliers, but played along with Harder’s plan. He said he was addicted to opioids at the time and wanted his relationship with Harder to continue so he could access the drugs.

“My client gave evidence to show he had no intention of trafficking in any drugs, he simply used it as a ruse so that he would be supplied with [oxycontin] and fentanyl,” Bodnar said.

The lawyers will submit closing arguments in writing later this month and early in January. Both sides will be back in court on Jan. 16 for rebuttals.

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