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Complete conservative collapse from six Winnipeg seats to zero

 From six out of eight Winnipeg seats for the conservatives, to zero.  Political analysts could not have predicted the degree to which the conservatives collapsed inside city limits Monday night.
From six out of eight Winnipeg seats for the conservatives, to zero. Political analysts could not have predicted the degree to which the conservatives collapsed inside city limits Monday night. Austin Grabish / Global News

WINNIPEG — From six out of eight Winnipeg seats for the conservatives, to zero.  Political analysts could not have predicted the degree to which the conservatives collapsed inside city limits Monday night.

Before and after of party ridings in Winnipeg

St. Boniface-St. Vital, Winnipeg South, Charleswood St. James, and Winnipeg South Centre all switched hands from the conservatives to the liberals. Tory stronghold Kildonan St. Paul came down to the wire before it eventually fell to the liberals too, with former Bomber COO Jim Bell losing to liberal candidate MaryAnn Mihychuk. That riding had been in the hands of the conservatives for 11 years with former MP Joy Smith.

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READ MORE:  Charleswood-St. James-Assiniboia-Headingley riding results

Another gain for the liberals in Winnipeg came in Winnipeg Centre in perhaps one of the most shocking results, as liberal candidate Robert-Falcon Ouellette stole the seat from former NDP MP Pat Martin who was seeking his seventh term.

The liberals also hung on to Winnipeg North with Kevin Lamoureux coming out with a much bigger margin of victory than the previous election.

READ MORE: Election results for all 14 Manitoba ridings

Elmwood-Transcona shifted hands to from conservative incumbant Lawrence Toet to NDP candidate Daniel Blaike, son of former NDP MP Bill Blaikie in a race that was neck in neck past midnight. At one point it became the closest riding in the country, down to one vote separating the two. Toet lost in the end.

U of M political studies analyst Royce Koop calls the liberal wave in Manitoba “massive,” adding “sweeping over traditional NDP strongholds is remarkable.”