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Canadian intelligence spies met with energy companies: report

Canadian foreign intelligence spies, who allegedly hacked into Brazil’s Mines and Energy Ministry (MME), took part in top-level secret meetings where Canada's security agencies briefed energy businesses, according to a report.Oil.
Canadian foreign intelligence spies, who allegedly hacked into Brazil’s Mines and Energy Ministry (MME), took part in top-level secret meetings where Canada's security agencies briefed energy businesses, according to a report.Oil. Getty Images

TORONTO – Canadian foreign intelligence spies, who allegedly hacked into Brazil’s Mines and Energy Ministry (MME), took part in top-level secret meetings where Canada’s security agencies briefed energy businesses, according to a report.

Documents obtained by The Guardian through the freedom of information act show Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) shared surveillance and intelligence with energy firms, federal ministries and spy and police agencies during secret meetings.

READ MORE: Mulcair says spying gives Canada black eye

The Guardian reports the most recent meeting, in May 2013, discussed “security of energy resources development” and was partially sponsored by Enbridge.

However, the documents don’t indicate whether any international intelligence was shared by CSEC, according to the newspaper.

READ MORE: Why is Canada’s privacy czar worried about the country’s cyber-spying agency?

The report comes days after Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff demanded Canada explain why one of its spy agencies was monitoring MME communications, allegations about which Prime Minister Stephen Harper said he’s “very concerned.”

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Harper said Canadian officials are “reaching out very proactively” to their counterparts in Brazil.

Watch the video below: Diplomatic fallout over Brazil spy report

More espionage allegations could surface, according to the journalist who revealed secret documents from ex-National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden.

“There’s a lot of other documents about Canadians spying on ordinary citizens, on allied governments, on the world, and their co-operation with the United States government,” Glenn Greenwald said in CBC interview.

“The nature of that co-operation that I think most Canadian citizens will find quite surprising, if not shocking, because it’s all done in secret and Canadians are not aware of it,” Greenwald said.

Watch: John Forster, Chief of CSEC, defends his organization as pressure mounts