Advertisement

COVID-19: N.S. reports 24 new deaths in latest update, hospitalizations down

Click to play video: 'What the discovery of Omicron sub variants means for Canadians' What the discovery of Omicron sub variants means for Canadians
Dr. Isaac Bogoch, Infectious diseases expert gives his diagnosis on the COVID situation in Canada and previews what the summer could look like ahead of the Victoria Day long weekend – May 18, 2022

Nova Scotia is reporting 2,513 new lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19, 59 hospitalizations and 24 deaths during the seven-day period ending May 16.

The province noted that the number of new cases, including those linked to long-care facility outbreaks, have continued to decline. New admissions to hospital have dropped as well.

Read more: COVID-19: Nova Scotia ending mandate for masks in public schools

In comparison, last week’s epidemiologic report included 3,118 new PCR-confirmed cases, 65 new hospitalizations and 18 deaths.

Speaking with reporters on Thursday, Deputy Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Shelley Deeks said while the number of deaths has increased this week over last, it was expected because deaths lag behind infections and hospitalizations.

“I fully expect in the coming weeks, the number of deaths will decrease,” she said.

Story continues below advertisement

According to the province’s data, the unvaccinated are at the highest risk of severe disease.

“The data show that having three doses of vaccine — a full primary series and a booster — reduces the risk of hospitalization by 85 per cent and the risk of death by more than 92 per cent,” read a news release.

Age is a big factor too.

The data shows the risk of hospitalization is nearly 11 times higher and the risk of death is nearly 114 times higher for people aged 70 and older.

“Of the 24 deaths reported this week, 22 people (91.7 per cent) were 70 years of age or older. Nine people (37.5 per cent) lived in long-term care facilities,” the release said.

Deeks further said that the remaining two deaths reported were among people aged 50 to 69.

All this leads the province to continue to encourage vaccination, especially a second booster dose, for those aged 70 and older.

As of Thursday, 65.5 per cent of Nova Scotians 18 and older have received a booster dose and 52,725 people have received a fourth dose of vaccine.

Click to play video: 'Ongoing COVID-19 restrictions for long-term care facilities impacting residents' Ongoing COVID-19 restrictions for long-term care facilities impacting residents
Ongoing COVID-19 restrictions for long-term care facilities impacting residents – Apr 29, 2022

Sponsored content