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APAS to conduct research into farmer share of increasing food prices

Ian Boxall, president of APAS, said the organization wants to promote awareness when it comes to increasing food costs which are being attributed to high commodity prices. File / Global News

The Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS) is hoping to learn more about the farmer share of food dollar.

The association passed a resolution during its annual general meeting on Tuesday that will have them team up with other farming organizations to conduct research into the percentage of food prices that goes to primary production.

The resolution also states that APAS will work with the Canadian Federation of Agriculture on this front.

Read more: Many Saskatchewan farmers unable to fill grain contracts: industry survey

Ian Boxall, who was recently named the newest president of APAS, said the organization wants to promote awareness when it comes to increasing food costs which are being attributed to high commodity prices.

He added that members want the organization to look at the correlation between what the consumer pays at the grocery store for food and what the producer receives in turn.

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“There are some blurred lines there where when people see the prices of food go up, they immediately assume that the extra costs they are paying at the grocery store go back to the producer, and that isn’t actually so,” Boxall said.

“For example, with the cost of a loaf of bread, what does a farmer get for their portion of wheat in that loaf of bread? Maybe it’s canola oil and the correlation of the cost at the grocery store and what the producer gets.”

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Boxall continued by saying they want to show the supply chain from the producer to the grocery store and what those costs are along the way.

He believes bringing the information back, having a look at it and putting it out for people to see will give residents an understanding of the flow from the farm to the grocery store and where money is spent along the way.

“Consumers need to understand that what they are paying at the shelf is not a direct correlation to what producers are being paid.”

Boxall said they will compile the information and roll it out in a document to share with the public once the process is complete.

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