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Afghanistan refugees have begun to arrive in Waterloo Region

Click to play video: 'The New Reality: November 27' The New Reality: November 27
Mohammed Ismail, known affectionately as Captain Smiley, spent six years protecting our troops in Afghanistan. Now, with the help of a group of Canadian veterans, he has made a remarkable journey to escape his Taliban-controlled country to a new life in the Greater Toronto Area. In this week’s episode of The New Reality, Jeff Semple takes an inside look at the challenges ahead for him and his family, and also for the 40,000 Afghans hoping to settle in Canada – Nov 27, 2021

About 200 Afghan refugees have arrived in Waterloo Region. And more are expected in the coming days.

A new task force has been launched to help resettle them, says the Waterloo Region Immigration Partnership (WRIP).

Read more: Inside the Kabul safe houses where Afghans wait to be evacuated to Canada

It will involve members of the Partnership council and the Kitchener-Waterloo Multicultural Centre.

The Waterloo Region is one of 34 resettlement locations across Canada selected by the federal government for government-assisted refugees. A total of 40,000 refugees will be making new homes in Canada.

Click to play video: '‘I feel empty inside’: Afghan family still waits for Canada’s help after being split fleeing Kabul' ‘I feel empty inside’: Afghan family still waits for Canada’s help after being split fleeing Kabul
‘I feel empty inside’: Afghan family still waits for Canada’s help after being split fleeing Kabul – Nov 23, 2021

“Everyone plays a vital role in ensuring the success of our efforts to welcome and support refugees settling in the region,” said Tara Bedard, Immigration Partnership Executive Dire.

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“We worked as a community to welcome many Syrian refugees in 2015-16, and we will do the same again.”

Read more: Afghan prime minister says Taliban not to blame for deepening crisis

“We are leaning into what we know worked well during the Syrian initiative, and figuring out what we need to do differently in light of changes in the community, the pandemic and the ongoing restrictions we face,” Bedard said.

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