Advertisement

B.C. paramedics respond to highest-ever number of overdose calls in a single day

Click to play video: 'B.C. marks five years since overdose crisis public health emergency declaration' B.C. marks five years since overdose crisis public health emergency declaration
WATCH: Five years ago, a public health emergency was declared for the overdose crisis. Since then more than 7,000 people have lost their lives to drug toxicity. Emad Agahi reports – Apr 14, 2021

As B.C. health officials reported more grim COVID-19 numbers Thursday, paramedics released sobering data showing the province’s other health crisis shows no signs of slowing down.

According to BC Emergency Health Services, paramedics responded to the province’s highest single-day number of overdose calls in B.C.’s history on Wednesday.

Read more: ‘The same sadness and more lives lost’: Frontline workers reflect on 5 years of B.C.’s overdose crisis

Crews were tasked to 138 potential overdoses, 45 of them in Vancouver, 17 of them in Surrey, 10 in Victoria and 66 across the rest of the province.

B.C. marked the five-year anniversary of the official designation of its overdose crisis as a public health emergency on April 14.

Click to play video: 'BCEHS reports surge in demand for monitoring overdoses with Lifeguard App' BCEHS reports surge in demand for monitoring overdoses with Lifeguard App
BCEHS reports surge in demand for monitoring overdoses with Lifeguard App – Mar 12, 2021

In that time, more than 7,000 people have died of suspected illicit drug overdoses, driven by rampant toxicity in the supply of street drugs.

Story continues below advertisement

In 2020 alone, more than 1,724 people died of toxic drugs, while at least 329 deaths in the first two months of 2021 have been attributed to the same cause.

Read more: B.C. to officially request federal exemption to decriminalize drug possession

Drug users, policy experts and government officials say the COVID-19 pandemic has only served to exacerbate the crisis.

Earlier this month, the B.C. government said it would seek a federal exemption from Health Canada to decriminalize the personal possession of drugs.

The province has also taken steps to allow some health-care workers to prescribe pharmaceutical alternatives to street drugs, but advocates say the process has been far too slow to roll out. 

Sponsored content