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Vancouver Tim Hortons gets licence yanked for breaking coronavirus health order

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The City of Vancouver has pulled the business licence of a Tim Hortons cafe for failing to comply with a provincial health order aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has ordered food-service businesses to close unless they can keep to a capacity of 50 people and maintain two metres between occupants.

The City of Vancouver has gone even further, limiting the number of people inside any building to 10 people.

READ MORE: Vancouver approves up to $50k in fines for ignoring emergency coronavirus measures

City inspectors visited the 108 West Pender St. location four times and issued several warnings, but eventually pulled the licence for “gross misconduct.”

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The suspension, which was issued Thursday, applies for three days.

Strict new orders for B.C. restaurants as COVID-19 cases jump by another 77
Strict new orders for B.C. restaurants as COVID-19 cases jump by another 77

In a statement, Tim Hortons said the licence was suspended after the bylaw officer found there was a sole extra person inside the store.

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“This is an unfortunate isolated incident in a very challenging neighbourhood,” a spokesperson said. “The restaurant owner works diligently to serve the guests who frequent her store who often have challenging social needs.”

The company said the store owner will request support from Vancouver police to help keep customers inside limited to 10 people at a time.

READ MORE: Coronavirus: Bylaw officers to help enforce B.C. health orders with $25,000 fines

“The restaurant management worked with the bylaw officer to meet local standards — including adding taped boxes, as it was lines taped on the floor, for guests to stand in, as requested by the bylaw officer,” the spokesperson added.

Since March 20, property-use inspectors have visited more than 5,800 restaurants and 1,000 personal services businesses to check for compliance, the city said.

Councillor passed regulations on Monday that allow the city to issue fines of up to $50,000 to businesses caught breaking public health orders. As of Friday, it has yet to do so.

—With files from Erin Ubels