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1 in 4 Canadians believe humans were created by God within the last 10,000 years: poll

A modern human skull next to a Neandethal-era skull.
A modern human skull next to a Neandethal-era skull. Tim Schoon, University of Iowa

A new poll has found a hefty minority (23 per cent) of Canadians reject the theory of evolution, and instead believe a god created humans within the last 10,000 years.

The survey, conducted by Research Co., found 61 per cent of Canadians believe humans “definitely” or “probably” evolved from less-advanced life forms over millions of years. That’s down five points from a similar Research Co. poll last year.

READ MORE: WATCH: Bill Nye the Science Guy predicts end of creationism is nigh

Seventeen per cent of people said they were unsure.

British Columbia was home to the highest number of people who said they believe humans were the product of evolution, at 67 per cent.

Quebec (64 per cent) was second, followed by Ontario (60 per cent), Alberta (59 per cent), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (57 per cent) and Atlantic Canada (54 per cent).

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C-sections affecting human evolution?
C-sections affecting human evolution?

The poll also found Canadians were divided on whether they believed creationism should be taught in schools.

READ MORE: Dawkins, Krauss have faith in ‘The Unbelievers’

According to the poll, 38 per cent of respondents said creationism should be taught in schools, while 39 per cent thought it should not, a drop of seven points from the last time Research Co. asked the question.

British Columbians (35 per cent) were the least likely to support teaching creationism in schools, followed by Quebec and Atlantic Canada (36 per cent and Ontario (37 per cent).

In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 43 per cent supported teaching it in schools, while in Alberta, 45 per cent did.

The poll found religious affiliation had a strong impact on whether Canadians supported teaching creationism in the classroom.

Catholics and Protestants backed the idea by 48 per cent, while only 20 per cent of those with no religion or who identify as atheists supported it.

The poll was based on an online study conducted from Nov. 4 to Nov. 6, 2019, among 1,000 adults Canadians. The data has been statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region in Canada. The margin of error—which measures sample variability—is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

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