Advertisement

Jailbird: Entangled owl freed as Regina police swoop to the rescue

Regina police officers came across a suspicious sight Thursday, an owl with its wings entangled in a soccer net.
Regina police officers came across a suspicious sight Thursday, an owl with its wings entangled in a soccer net. Jonathan Guignard / Global News

A great horned owl that ended up behind bars after an encounter with Regina police will soon be a free bird.

City patrol officers came across the owl with its wings entangled in a soccer net near Evraz Place early Thursday morning.

Story continues below advertisement

According to police, after some careful work to keep themselves and the owl safe, the bird was successfully rescued.

One officer, identified on social media as Const. Jon Cooper, is seen in a photo warming the feathery suspect with a jacket. Another image shows the owl placed behind bars.

But this is no jailbird — the owl skipped bail and was taken instead to Salthaven West Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Centre in Regina.

Megan Lawrence, director of rehabilitation at the centre, said the owl came in with bruising on its wing.

After an x-ray Friday, the bird was cleared for fractures or dislocations, given a mild anti-inflammatory and placed in an outdoor flight pen for observation.

Story continues below advertisement

“She’s a feisty owl, which is what we want to see. She’s in great body condition, she’s healthy, and she wants nothing to do with us,” Lawrence said.

She added the owl is most likely female due to size – female raptors are typically 30 per cent larger than males.

READ MORE: Saskatchewan drivers beware: wildlife on the move during harvest season

Lawrence noted that while great horned owls are common in the city of Regina, people may not always see them because they’re nocturnal.

She’s hopeful the owl can be released in a couple days with her rescuer, Cooper, in attendance.

“We will take her out on a practice flight, where we put them on a creance line and make sure they’re healthy and ready to go,” Lawrence said.

There are currently 11 great horned owls receiving care at the rehabilitation centre, which is a non-profit organization staffed by volunteers and funded by donations.