Advertisement

Harvest operations get underway in Saskatchewan

Southern regions are furthest along, with one per cent of the crop combined as harvest operations are underway in Saskatchewan. File / Global News

Just over one per cent of the 2019 crop is swathed or ready to straight-cut, and less than one per cent is combined, as harvest operations get underway in Saskatchewan.

The five-year average for this time of year is four per cent combined and five per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut, Saskatchewan Agriculture said Thursday in its crop report.

READ MORE: Bee population recovering due to regenerative farming, producers say

Southern regions are furthest along, with one per cent of the crop combined. Rain in the last week delayed harvest operations, with rainfall ranging from trace amounts to 82 millimetres in the Pense area.

Officials said the recent rain might cause downgrading and quality issues in pulse crops.

Story continues below advertisement

Producers in other regions have less than one per cent of the crop in the bins and most farmers expect to start their harvest in the coming weeks, officials said.

Of the crops that have been harvested across Saskatchewan, 17 per cent of the fall rye, 14 per cent of the winter wheat, three per cent of the field peas and one per cent of the lentils are now in the bins.

Cropland moisture is rated at three per cent surplus, 78 per cent adequate, 17 per cent short and two per cent very short.

Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture are rated at one per cent surplus, 72 per cent adequate, 25 per cent short and two per cent very short.

READ MORE: Farmers look to capture carbon as warnings of climate shocks grow louder

Hay yields are reported to be below average across the province, officials said.

Saskatchewan Agriculture estimates average dryland hay yields at 0.9 tons per acre for alfalfa, one ton per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass, 0.8 tons per acre for other tame hay, 0.7 tons per acre for wild hay and 1.8 tons per acre for greenfeed.

For irrigated hay yields, estimates are 2.4 tons per acre for alfalfa, 2.2 tons per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass, 1.9 tons per acre for other tame hay, 1.2 tons per acre for wild hay and 3.2 tons per acre for greenfeed.

Story continues below advertisement

Crop damage in the last week was caused by localized flooding and strong winds, Saskatchewan Agriculture reported.

WATCH (June 2019): ‘Miracle crop’ re-surging in popularity across Saskatchewan farms

Click to play video: '‘Miracle crop’ re-surging in popularity across Saskatchewan farms' ‘Miracle crop’ re-surging in popularity across Saskatchewan farms
‘Miracle crop’ re-surging in popularity across Saskatchewan farms – Jun 19, 2019

Sponsored content