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Hamilton closes waterfront trails due to high water levels of Lake Ontario

A look at York Boulevard as the Hamilton Conservation Authority closed two waterfront trails on Tuesday.
A look at York Boulevard as the Hamilton Conservation Authority closed two waterfront trails on Tuesday. Hamilton Conservation Authority

Sections from two of Hamilton’s waterfront trails closed on Tuesday after areas flooded due to high water levels coming off of Lake Ontario.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority (HCA) says both Harbour Waterfront Trail and Lake Ontario Waterfront Trail have seen “flooding, debris and erosion” caused by high water levels from Lake Ontario.

The areas temporarily closed include:

  • Bayfront Park to Princess Point on Hamilton’s Waterfront trail
  • Lake Ontario Waterfront Trail is closed east of Wild Water Works to the bridge beyond the Waterfront Trail Lookout Point
  • There are also restrictions due to damage near the Breezeway Trail at the Burlington Bridge
  • The York Street High-Bridge stairs to the Bayfront Trail are also now closed until further notice

READ MORE: Hamilton Conservation Authority issues safety reminder after fatal fall at Dundas Peak

“These areas will be closed until water levels subside. Residents are advised to avoid these areas,” the Conservation Authority said in a statement. “We will continue to monitor daily and share updates as they are available.”

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Hazardous conditions in the marina area have already closed the boardwalk around the marina at Fifty Point Conservation Area until further notice.

The HCA says their general flood watch continues and reminds residents to “exercise caution near lakefront areas” due to high water levels potentially “causing erosion, flooding and public safety hazards.”

The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority
A look at York Boulevard as the Hamilton Conservation Authority closed two waterfront trails on Tuesday.
A look at York Boulevard as the Hamilton Conservation Authority closed two waterfront trails on Tuesday. Hamilton Conservation Authority
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority
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The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding.
The Hamilton Conservation Authority has closed two waterfront trails due to flooding. Hamilton Conservation Authority

Meanwhile, rising water levels from Lake Ontario have forced two other nearby conservation authorities to upgrade flood watches.

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Conservation Halton says “record high inflows from Lake Erie combined with reduced outflows from Lake Ontario” have suggested that there’s a possibility of levels rising 10 cms in that region over the next week, potentially exceeding peak levels recorded in 2017.

It’s expected their flood watch for Lake Ontario will remain in effect until June 5.

Further east, the Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) says they still have concerns on two fronts.

READ MORE: Man falls to his death near Dundas Peak Trail in Hamilton

The authority that manages 41 nearby waterfront properties says both Lake Ontario’s water levels are still rising, as well as Lake Erie already having set a record for water levels.

“As of May 22, Lake Erie’s static water level was 175 metres. This water level is 76 centimetres above average and 9 cm above the record-high set during the 3rd quarter of May back in 1986,” said the NPCA.

It’s expected Lake Ontario’s water levels near Niagara will rise some more, due to the record flows from Lake Erie. Water levels are 76 cm above average for this time of year but 7 cm below the record-high levels set in 2017.

The NCPA says their latest watches will remain in effect until the end of the week at which time they will be updated.

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WATCH: Residents on Toronto Islands worried of flooding as Lake Ontario water levels continue to rise

Residents on Toronto Islands worried of flooding as Lake Ontario water levels continue to rise
Residents on Toronto Islands worried of flooding as Lake Ontario water levels continue to rise