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Woman charged after OSPCA seize 57 dogs, 4 cats from Colborne home

A Colborne, Ont., woman faces animal cruelty charges after 57 dogs and four cats were seized from her home.
A Colborne, Ont., woman faces animal cruelty charges after 57 dogs and four cats were seized from her home. OSPCA logo

A Colborne, Ont., woman faces numerous animal cruelty charges after 57 dogs and four cats were removed from her home earlier this month.

The OSPCA executed a warrant on a home in Colborne (about 24 kilometres east of Cobourg) on March 21 after receiving concerns about the health of a large number of dogs on the property.

READ MORE: Peterborough woman charged with 33 counts of animal cruelty involving farm animals

“Upon entering the house, the officer discovered a large number of Golden Retriever-type dogs in poor body condition that were living in unsanitary conditions,” the OSPCA stated on Thursday.

Orders were issued to have the dogs examined by a veterinarian, develop a nutrition plan and to improve sanitation and ventilation in the home. The OSPCA said it attempted to work with the 58-year-old animal owner to gain compliance with regulatory standards of care outlined under provincial animal welfare legislation.

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But the OSPCA says ongoing concerns for the welfare of the animals “necessitated their removal.”

Another warrant on June 13 saw the removal of the animals. They are currently in the OSPCA’s custody and receiving care.

The woman, whose name was not released, has been charged with:

• Permitting dogs to be in distress
• Failing to provide adequate and appropriate food and water
• Failing to provide adequate medical attention
• Failing to provide the care necessary for general welfare
• Failing to provide an adequate and appropriate resting and sleeping area
• Failing to provide a space to enable the animal to move naturally and to exercise
• Failing to provide sanitary conditions
• Failing to provide ventilation

She is scheduled to appear in court in Cobourg on August 15.

“If you find yourself in a position where you have more animals than you can properly care for, reach out to your local Ontario SPCA Animal Centre or Humane Society to discuss your options,” stated Jennifer Bluhm, OSPCA deputy chief inspector.

“Failing to provide your animals with the care they require is not an option.”

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