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B.C. municipal election 2018: Grand Forks results

Brian Taylor has been elected as mayor of Grand Forks with 48.2 per cent of the vote, after having served leading up to 2014.

Elected to council were incumbents Neil Krog and Christine Thompson. Also elected were Rod Zielinski, Chris Moslin, Zak Eburne-Stoodley and Catherine Korolek.

Candidates

Mayor:

Everett Baker

Gary Smith

Brian Taylor – elected

Council:

Julia Butler (incumbent)

Zak Eburne-Stoodley – elected

Stan Halluck

Chris Hammett (incumbent)

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Arnold Hoekstra

Cathy Korolek – elected

Neil Krog (incumbent) – elected

Chris Moslin – elected

Danna O’Donnell

Kyle Piper

Christine Thompson (incumbent) – elected

Cher Wyers

Rod Zielinski – elected

Boundary

Grand Forks is located on the Kettle River in B.C.’s West Kootenay region. It’s a short distance from the Canada-U.S. border and just over 100 kilometres from Trail.

Population (2016)

4,049

History

Indigenous people were present in the Grand Forks area, but they’re not believed to have settled there permanently.

The Doukhobors, however, did settle in Grand Forks. They’re a Russian sect who came to Canada fleeing persecution between 1909 and 1913, and they were attracted to the area’s rich soil, which would allow them to do self-sufficient farming.

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But agriculture hasn’t been the sole industry in Grand Forks. It’s also known for mining, smelting, with placer gold attracting prospectors in 1859.

The 1880s brought the first hard rock claim and mining accelerated even further with the arrival of the Columbia and Western Railway in 1899.

Copper was also discovered at a site known as “Phoenix.”

That mine would stir the construction of a smelter by the Granby Smelting Co. in 1900. It would become the British Empire’s biggest copper smelter.

Today, visitors to Grand Forks can see how the Doukhobors integrated into the community and added to its culture.

Median total income of couple economic families with children (2015)/B.C. median

$89,600/$111,736

Political representation

Federal

Richard Cannings (NDP)

Provincial

Linda Larson (BC Liberal)