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In Pictures: Snow takes centre stage at Canada vs. U.S. World Juniors game

Hockey fans hold up a sign in the stands during the heavy snowfall at the IIHF World Junior Championship outdoor game between Canada and the U.S. at New Era Field in Orchard Park, N.Y., on Dec. 29, 2017.
Hockey fans hold up a sign in the stands during the heavy snowfall at the IIHF World Junior Championship outdoor game between Canada and the U.S. at New Era Field in Orchard Park, N.Y., on Dec. 29, 2017. Mark Blinch/Canadian Press

The classic Canada-vs.-United States rivalry flared up yet again during the 2018 World Juniors while the snow fell hard on the rink.

Friday’s game was played outside, on a temporary rink on the NFL Buffalo Bills’ New Era Field.

The U.S. beat Canada 4-3 in an overtime shootout.

READ MORE: U.S. beats Canada 4-3 in shootout in World Juniors

The temperature was around -9 C for the duration of the game, with a wind chill of -12 C. There was snow as well as fog reported in the area.

But the players braved the cold to fight it out, as seen in these photos.

Brady Tkachuk (#7) of the U.S. team, takes a shot on the Canada net in the second period during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on Dec. 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York.
Brady Tkachuk (#7) of the U.S. team, takes a shot on the Canada net in the second period during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on Dec. 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Kevin Hoffman/Getty Images)
Players from the Canadian and the U.S. teams line up for a faceoff during the second period of a preliminary-round hockey game at the IIHF World Junior Championship in Buffalo, N.Y., on Dec. 29, 2017.
Players from the Canadian and the U.S. teams line up for a faceoff during the second period of a preliminary-round hockey game at the IIHF World Junior Championship in Buffalo, N.Y., on Dec. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)

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Boris Katchouk (#12) of Canada with the puck in the second period against the United States during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on Dec. 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York.
Boris Katchouk (#12) of Canada with the puck in the second period against the United States during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on Dec. 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Kevin Hoffman/Getty Images)
Canada vs. U.S. on Dec. 29, 2017.
Canada vs. U.S. on Dec. 29, 2017. Steve Autio / Global News

Snow shovellers were on the ice multiple times throughout the game. At one point, they cleared out three garbage cans and a wheelbarrow full of snow. 

That didn’t deter the crowd, however. The International Ice Hockey Federation said over 44,000 people turned out for the event despite the snowstorm. 

Hockey fans hold up a sign in the stands during the heavy snow at the IIHF World Junior Championship preliminary-round outdoor game between Canada and the USA at New Era Field in Buffalo, N.Y. on Dec. 29, 2017.
Hockey fans hold up a sign in the stands during the heavy snow at the IIHF World Junior Championship preliminary-round outdoor game between Canada and the USA at New Era Field in Buffalo, N.Y. on Dec. 29, 2017. Mark Blinch/Canadian Press
BUFFALO, NY – DECEMBER 29: Fans supporting Canada in the second period against the United States during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on December 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York.
BUFFALO, NY – DECEMBER 29: Fans supporting Canada in the second period against the United States during the IIHF World Junior Championship at New Era Field on December 29, 2017 in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Kevin Hoffman/Getty Images)

 

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Though some people weren’t happy with the decision to play outdoors.

Of the NHL’s 26 regular-season games played outdoors, five have been played with temperatures below -6 C. That includes this year’s NHL 100 Classic in Ottawa, when the game-time temperature was measured at -10 C.

The coldest was the NHL’s first outdoor game at Edmonton’s Commonwealth Stadium in 2003, when the temperature was -18 C.

— With files from the Canadian Press