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TV’s ‘Timber Kings’ fight to save log homes after B.C. wildfires destroy construction site

B.C. wildfires: Smoke looms over 100 Mile House
Video shot July 7 in 100 Mile House captures the looming smoke hanging over the community as flames crept closer to the town.

The team that builds the massive multi-million dollar log homes on the popular HGTV show Timber Kings is fighting to save two of their build-sites near Williams Lake.

But they’ve already lost one.

Bryan Reid Sr. owns Pioneer Log Homes, and said the fire near 150 Mile House tore through their third site last Friday.

LISTEN: Pioneer Log Homes suffers massive loss due yo B.C. wildfire


Reid said when the fire hit, it grew out of control within half an hour, and the crew had to choose between saving the site and helping friends evacuate their homes.
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They opted to help with the evacuation.

“We had four homes under construction. We’ll have to let the owners know, of course. They are all custom, you can’t just add water and grow another one, it takes time,” he said.

Timber Kings follows Reid and his Williams Lake-based crew as they construct one-of-a-kind timber mansions from raw logs to completed structures.

The homes are initially built in B.C., then taken apart, transported to clients around the world, and rebuilt on-site.

GALLERY: Click to see some of the homes Reid and his team have built on Timber Kings

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Some of those homes have resold for as much as $9 million.

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The crew has now turned its attention to protecting its two remaining B.C. construction sites, one at Williams Lake, and the other near Soda Creek, Reid said.

“It’s all trying to protect what we have so there isn’t another catastrophe like that. It’s kind of a monster fire up here,” he said.

“I stay at the Williams Lake site overnight, wait in the truck and walk around every 20 minutes for spark watch. I’m here 24/7 right now.”

Reid said he was initially devastated by the loss of the first site, but has now turned his attention to the work of protecting what’s left.

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He said the team has been getting invaluable help from the local 150 Mile House firefighters and a team of firefighters who have travelled to the interior from Abbotsford.