Advertisement

Smoke from B.C. wildfires blowing into Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and U.S.

Edmonton under air quality advisory because of B.C. fires
WATCH ABOVE: An air quality advisory has been issued for Edmonton as smoke from the wildfires in B.C. drifts east. Tina Simpkin filed this report on July 11, 2017.

Smoke from hundreds of wildfires burning in British Columbia is making its way across Western Canada, and even into the United States.

On Tuesday morning, Environment Canada issued air quality advisories for west of Edmonton all the way to the Alberta-B.C. border, including the communities of Hinton, Rocky Mountain House, Whitecourt, Spruce Grove and Jasper National Park.

FireSmoke Canada’s interactive map shows heavy clouds of smoke moving across central and southern Alberta, into the southern portion of Saskatchewan and the very southwest corner of Manitoba.

READ MORE: B.C. wildfires map 2017: Current location of wildfires around the province

Washington and Montana may also see some smoke drift across the northern part of the two states.

READ MORE: B.C. wildfire: How a wet spring might have aided the inferno’s rapid spread

Late Monday afternoon, Alberta Health Services issued a precautionary air quality advisory for the entire Edmonton Zone of AHS.

Story continues below advertisement

AHS said air quality was expected to be variable over the next few days and possibly weeks because of the wildfires burning in B.C.

According to AHS, although minor smoke conditions do not typically cause health concerns in healthy individuals, if smoke conditions become more severe, even healthy individuals may experience temporary irritation of eyes and throat, and possibly shortness of breath.

WATCH: Saskatchewan sends resources to aid British Columbia in fighting wildfires

Saskatchewan sends resources to aid British Columbia in fighting wildfires
Saskatchewan sends resources to aid British Columbia in fighting wildfires

The agency says anyone suffering from symptoms should stay inside with windows, doors and air circulation fans closed.

The agency recommends people with existing respiratory conditions, existing heart conditions, infants and children seven and under, people over 65, pregnant women and smokers take precautions anytime there is wildfire smoke in the area.

Those who are at-risk are urged to limit exposure to smoke by:

  • Staying indoors, with the windows closed, whenever possible
  • Reduce indoor pollution like smoke from tobacco, wood-burning stoves or burning candles
  • Using high-efficiency (HEPA) air filters when possible
  • Avoid vacuuming
  • Keep windows in the car closed and turn on the air conditioning to re-circulate
  • Drinking plenty of water

Anyone having a severe medical emergency from the smoke should call 911 when available, or get to the closest emergency room immediately.

Story continues below advertisement
Thick smoke is seen near the gates of Alberta’s Jasper National Park on Monday evening.
Thick smoke is seen near the gates of Alberta’s Jasper National Park on Monday evening. Sarah Kraus, Global News

READ MORE: Fire ban extended for all of B.C.

Fires in B.C. have forced more than 10,000 people from their homes. Premier Rachel Notley announced Monday that Alberta will be sending firefighters to help battle the blazes.

-With files from The Canadian Press.