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Bear cubs found in Banff bathroom heading to Ontario rehab facility

One of three bear cubs found trapped in a bathroom in Banff National Park on April 1. Parks Canada

The three black bear cubs that were found trapped in a bathroom in Banff National Park earlier this month will soon be heading to a rehabilitation facility in Ontario.

Parks Canada said in a release Thursday the bears will be sent to the Aspen Valley rehabilitation facility, but didn’t currently have details on when or how the bears will be moved.

READ MORE: Confusion over fate of 3 bear cubs found in Banff bathroom from government, rehab societies

Since being found by a passerby in the park, the bears have been in the care of Parks Canada, where they’re being cared for at Banff National Park and their exposure to humans is being limited.

Parks Canada said they chose Aspen Valley because it’s “reputable, has sufficient space, expertise, and a track record of success with this sort of situation.”

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It’s hoped the bears, which are reported to be healthy, will be returned “back to the mountain park landscape” once they’re rehabilitated, Parks Canada said.

Travis Ripley, the executive director for fish and wildlife police at Alberta Environment, told Global News Tuesday that it’s against Alberta government policy, however, to release rehabilitated bears back into the wild in the province.

WATCH: Parks Canada is investigating after three black bear cubs were found in a Banff National Park restroom, without their mother

Click to play video: 'Black bear cubs found in Banff National Park restroom' Black bear cubs found in Banff National Park restroom
Black bear cubs found in Banff National Park restroom – Apr 7, 2017

“Our policy in Alberta is that we don’t allow the rehabilitation of bears,” Travis Ripley said.

“There [are] several factors: there’s already a very high population of bears in the province…other reasons include a high degree of risk of habituation in certain facilities and the protocols aren’t in line in Alberta right now to make sure bears aren’t placed in a habituated situation.”
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“Habituation” happens when bears are in contact with humans during care and feeding, Ripley said.

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