Advertisement

Vancouver to look at setting Chinatown street parking at $2 per hour

Click to play video: 'Vancouver to look at setting Chinatown street parking at $2 per hour'
Vancouver to look at setting Chinatown street parking at $2 per hour
The city of Vancouver is proposing changes to the price of curbside parking meters in Chinatown. The pilot project would mean the price at a meter would be set at two dollars an hour between 9am and 10pm. It's a move that's hoping to generate more consistent pricing across the area and generate more business. Christa Dao reports. – Apr 20, 2023

Vancouver city council is set to consider slashing some street parking fees as it works to revitalize the city’s beleaguered historic Chinatown.

Street parking rates in the neighbourhood currently range from $1 per hour to $5 per hour during the day, and from $1 to $ 3 per hour in the evenings.

Click to play video: 'Vancouver Chinatown BIA on council potentially slashing street parking fees'
Vancouver Chinatown BIA on council potentially slashing street parking fees
Story continues below advertisement

“Through engagement with stakeholders in Chinatown, businesses expressed a desire for cheaper parking and less variability in parking meter fees from block to block,” a report from the city’s general manager of engineering services headed to city council next week states.

“Although some businesses wanted free parking during certain times of day, others recognized that free parking would result in a lack of turnover and less parking availability for customers.”

Analysis of the impacts of various potential street parking fees for Vancouver’s Chinatown.
Analysis of the impacts of various potential street parking fees for Vancouver’s Chinatown. City of Vancouver

The staff report recommends setting all on-street parking meter fees at $2 per hour between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m. as a pilot project that would run to the end of 2024.

Breaking news from Canada and around the world sent to your email, as it happens.
For news impacting Canada and around the world, sign up for breaking news alerts delivered directly to you when they happen.

Get breaking National news

For news impacting Canada and around the world, sign up for breaking news alerts delivered directly to you when they happen.
By providing your email address, you have read and agree to Global News' Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.

The report estimates that fee structure would cost the city about $355,000 in revenue.

The report also proposes several alternative fee structures that could also encourage visitors to the area.

Story continues below advertisement
Click to play video: 'Vancouver’s Chinatown business owners and residents say situation improving'
Vancouver’s Chinatown business owners and residents say situation improving

One alternative would see street parking capped at $1 per hour in the mornings, from 9 a.m. to noon, an idea that would cost the city about $215,000 in revenue.

A third option would involve reducing existing street parking rates by $1 from 9 a.m. to noon at parking meters where the current price exceeds $3.

That option is projected to cost the city about $280,000.

A fourth proposal would make parking free after 4 p.m., an initiative estimated to cost the city $785,000 by the end of 2024.

The report notes that parking meter fees are adjusted annually on a block-by-block basis, and that meter fees on more than half the blocks in Chinatown are currently set at $2 per hour or less.

Story continues below advertisement

Staff analysis found none of the options were likely to improve the availability of parking in the area, and that the flat $2 fee structure and free evening parking concept would be attractive to daytime and evening customers.

It also highlighted the possibility that other neighbourhoods could seek to have the lower fees applied to their parking fees, and states that applying the listed options city-wide could come at an annual cost of between $7.2 million and $18.6 million.

The proposal comes after council approved a $2.2 million plan to revitalize the neighbourhood, which has been plagued by vandalism, drug use and street disorder.

That plan focuses heavily on street cleaning, with money set aside to help address rampant graffiti in the community.

Sponsored content

AdChoices