Advertisement

B.C. RCMP seize fawn during traffic stop in Fort St. John

The fawn inside an RCMP vehicle, checking out a smiling police officer after it was found in the backseat of a vehicle on June 30. B.C. RCMP

Traffic stops by police are an everyday occurrence, but one with a fawn in the backseat?

That’s what police in Fort St. John encountered during the early hours of Thursday, June 30.

According to the RCMP, after the vehicle was pulled over, officers spotted an approximately one-month-old baby deer in the backseat.

Read more: Leave fawns alone: B.C. Conservation Officer Service

“The occupants of the vehicle were arrested for possession of live wildlife, with the subsequent investigation resulting in drugs being seized,” said police.

Police say “the fawn enjoyed some time with RCMP members before being handed over to Conservation. The deer will be headed for the Rimrock Wildlife Rehab to be reintegrated to the wild once able to do so.”

Story continues below advertisement
The fawn at rest while waiting to be picked up by the B.C. Conservation Officer Service.
The fawn at rest while waiting to be picked up by the B.C. Conservation Officer Service. B.C. RCMP

RCMP added that they are still investigating, as is the B.C. Conservation Office.

The Conservation Officer Service (BCCOS) issues reminders every spring to leave fawns alone, and not to disturb them.

Click to play video: 'Conservation officers remind public to leave fawns alone' Conservation officers remind public to leave fawns alone
Conservation officers remind public to leave fawns alone – May 30, 2022

It also says taking a fawn into your care is illegal under the Wildlife Act, and people can be fined for unlawful possession of live wildlife. Fines start at $345.

Story continues below advertisement

“Every year, the BCCOS receives calls from well-intentioned people trying to ‘rescue’ fawns they believe are orphaned, but interfering can cause more harm than good,” said the COS.

“We understand they are cute and appear defenceless, but please be assured it is common for does to leave their fawns for hours at a time while they forage for food.

“Moving a fawn can result in it not being able to reunite with its mother, thus greatly reducing its chances of survival. Leaving newborn deer alone is the best thing you can do to help them.”

However, the COS says if you are concerned a fawn is injured or abandoned, call the RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277.

Click to play video: 'New Brunswick couple rescues fawn stuck in fence' New Brunswick couple rescues fawn stuck in fence
New Brunswick couple rescues fawn stuck in fence – Aug 7, 2021

 

Sponsored content