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‘Stay hydrated, try to keep cool’: Southern Manitoba braces for hot weather

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After a cold and wet spring, Manitobans are being reminded to stay safe in the heat as temperatures are expected to turn way up for much of the province this weekend – Jun 17, 2022

After a cold and wet spring, Manitobans are being reminded to stay safe in the heat as temperatures are expected to turn way up for much of the province this weekend.

Temperatures are forecast to hit 35 C in Winnipeg on Sunday, according to Environment Canada.

Read more: City launches public hydration stations to help Winnipeggers beat summer heat

Global News weather specialist Kahla Evans says the humidity on Sunday and in the following days could make things feel even hotter.

Click to play video: 'June 17th Weather Update with Kahla Evans' June 17th Weather Update with Kahla Evans
June 17th Weather Update with Kahla Evans – Jun 17, 2022

The forecast pushed the province to issue a heat advisory Friday. Health officials people can die from prolonged exposure to heat when their body temperatures rise over 40 C.

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“With that heat we do have to worry about those who are vulnerable and those workers who are doing those jobs out in the sun and those taking on recreational activities,” Manitoba’s deputy chief provincial public health officer, Dr. Jazz Atwal, told Global News Winnipeg Morning Friday.

“We want to make sure we’re all drinking plenty of liquids, plenty of water (and) let’s limit those things that dehydrate us, including caffeinated beverages and alcohol.”

Atwal says older adults with chronic illnesses, those living alone, young children, and pregnant women are at higher risk.

Read more: City launches public hydration stations to help Winnipeggers beat summer heat

“Look in on people who are vulnerable, give them a phone call or visit them, see how they’re doing,” he said, adding signs of heat-related illnesses can include dehydration, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and muscle cramping.

“You can go from heat exhaustion to heat stroke. Getting a headache, feeling light-headed, sweating initially and then no sweating later on is a stark warning sign.”

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What you need to know about heat-related illness – Jul 14, 2019

Manitoba Marathon

Atwal also recommends avoiding strenuous outdoor exercise in the heat, something that will be difficult to do for those taking part in the Manitoba Marathon in Winnipeg on Sunday.

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While Atwal says the fact the marathon starts in the morning — when temperatures will be lower — is good, he encourages runners to make sure they’re drinking plenty of water or sports drinks with electrolytes and watching for symptoms of heat-related illnesses while taking part in the annual race.

Read more: Manitoban organizations see volunteer shortage amidst return to in-person events

“Make sure you’re hydrated, get a good night sleep, avoid those caffeinated beverages,” he said. “Wear a hat, wear loose-fitting clothing.”

Atwal says marathon runners can use the heat as a motivation to try to clock their fastest time.

Click to play video: 'Staying safe with extreme heat expected in Winnipeg' Staying safe with extreme heat expected in Winnipeg
Staying safe with extreme heat expected in Winnipeg – Jun 17, 2022

“Try to get out of the heat quick, try to run that race rather quickly so you’re back in the shade rather quickly as well,” he said.

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He recommends runners — and anyone working or spending time outdoors — sit under a tree or shady spot, telling Global News the shade can drop temperatures by as much as 5 C.

Read more: Manitoba is heating up. Is your air conditioner ready?

The City of Winnipeg also launched a pilot hydration project this week, with a clean drinking water station installed at Central Park, and two more — at the Broadway Neighbourhood Centre and at Selkirk Avenue and Powers Street — to be installed in the coming days.

The city says that in addition to indoor pools and outdoor spray pads as convenient ways to cool down, Winnipeggers can beat the heat by going inside at leisure centres and libraries during operating hours.

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Atwal says those without air conditioning at home should refrain from using their ovens to cook, and recommends leaving home to access air conditioning if possible.

According to Environment Canada, Winnipeg can expect a high of 33 C on Monday, with a chance of showers, before temperatures drop back below 30 starting Tuesday.

Atwal says it’s important that everyone watch for symptoms and check on friends and family during hot weather.

Read more: Manitoba faces incoming heat wave: climatologist

“Keep track of how you’re feeling,” he said. “If you develop those symptoms, increase your water intake, and obviously, if things get worse, seek out medical attention.”

The province says anyone with someone in the heat who becomes unconscious, is confused or feels dry and hot, should call 911.

“This may be heat stroke, which is a medical emergency,” reads a provincial release late in the day Friday.

“While waiting for emergency medical help, cool the person right away by moving them to a cool or shaded place, apply cold water to large areas of the skin or clothing, and fan the person as much as possible.”

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