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COVID-19: Saskatchewan reports first Omicron variant cases

Click to play video: 'COVID-19: First Omicron variant cases reported in Saskatchewan'
COVID-19: First Omicron variant cases reported in Saskatchewan
The Ministry of Health said Wednesday that four members from a single, undisclosed Saskatchewan household have screened positive for the Omicron variant of concern after returning from travel. – Dec 8, 2021

The first cases of the Omicron variant have been reported in Saskatchewan.

The Ministry of Health said Wednesday that four members from a single household with a travel history to one of the 10 countries of concern identified by the Canadian government have screened positive for the Omicron variant of concern.

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The ministry said their location is not being disclosed as it would risk identifying the individual.

Health officials said the four individuals and their close contacts have been identified and are currently isolating.

They added that contact investigations that are underway have confirmed the risk of community transmission is low.

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The ministry said if contact investigations determined there was a risk of community transmission, additional information would be provided to residents to self-monitor or self-isolate and seek testing.

Canada has restricted travel from 10 African nations due to the Omicron variant: South Africa, Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Lesotho, Eswatini, Nigeria, Malawi and Egypt.

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