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Mary Simon is now officially Canada’s first Indigenous governor general

Click to play video: 'Mary Simon sworn in as Canada’s 30th governor general' Mary Simon sworn in as Canada’s 30th governor general
WATCH: Mary Simon officially became Canada’s new governor general and the first Indigenous person to hold the role following an installation ceremony in Ottawa on Monday morning. Simon took both the oath of allegiance and the oath of office to become Canada’s 30th governor general – Jul 26, 2021

Mary Simon is now officially the country’s new governor general and the first Indigenous person to hold the role following an installation ceremony in Ottawa on Monday morning.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau named Simon, an Inuk leader and former Canadian diplomat, as his choice to be the Queen’s representative in Canada earlier this month, replacing Julie Payette who resigned in January.

Click to play video: 'Canada’s new governor general Mary Simon discusses bringing Canadians together' Canada’s new governor general Mary Simon discusses bringing Canadians together
Canada’s new governor general Mary Simon discusses bringing Canadians together – Jul 26, 2021

Trudeau was among the few people allowed to witness the ceremony in person as public health guidelines have set limits on attendance and mask requirements for anyone there in person.

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Simon was greeted at the Senate building by a First Nations drumming circle and accompanied by a traditional Inuit drummer on her way into the Senate chamber.

Read more: Pomp during a pandemic: What Mary Simon’s GG installation ceremony will look like

Inside the chamber, a traditional Inuit oil lamp remained lit during the ceremony.

Simon’s first speech as governor general focused on the themes of reconciliation and youth, as well as outlined her pledges to work to destigmatize mental health and to promote community-led climate change solutions, including those in Arctic communities bearing the brunt of a warming climate.

She spoke about the need to balance the “tension of the past” with the “promise of the future,” and vowed to carry out her work with “humility and purpose.”

“I am honoured, humbled and ready to be Canada’s first Indigenous governor general,” Simon said in her speech.

“I have heard from Canadians who describe a renewed sense of possibility for our country and hope that I can bring people together. I have heard from Canadians who have challenged me to bring a renewed purpose to the office of governor general to help Canadians deal with the issues we are facing.”

She spoke in both English and Inuktituk, in which she is fluent, as well as in French, which she does not speak but has promised to learn. Simon noted as several points that she stumbled over the pronunciation, but reiterated her commitment to learning the language.

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“I’m having a little trouble pronouncing, but I’m learning,” she said, and thanked Canadians who have reached out to her over recent weeks to express their support as she vows to work at learning French.

Click to play video: 'Trudeau says Canada needs people like Mary Simon who ‘build bridges’' Trudeau says Canada needs people like Mary Simon who ‘build bridges’
Trudeau says Canada needs people like Mary Simon who ‘build bridges’ – Jul 26, 2021

Trudeau said Simon will be able to build bridges between Canadians of different backgrounds and brings a strong record of public service to the role.

“I am inspired by the historic nature of this moment, as our country continues to come to terms with the difficult realities of our collective past,” said Trudeau in a statement on her swearing-in.

“I know that, as Canada’s first Indigenous Governor General, Her Excellency will devote herself to helping us as we confront these difficult truths together, walk the shared path of reconciliation, and build bridges between all those who call our country home.”

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READ MORE: Mary Simon’s lack of French prompts investigation after 400 complaints: watchdog

Though vaccination levels across the country continue to rise, Simon’s installation was a markedly more intimate affair for those attending in person. Traditionally, such ceremonies for her predecessors have drawn crowds into the hundreds including cabinet ministers, senators, MPs, justices of the Supreme Court of Canada, dignitaries and invited guests all packed into the Senate space.

This year, only 44 people attended in person — with many more watching the ceremony streamed live across the country — because of the pandemic restrictions.

Attendees were masked throughout, with the exception of those speaking or performing.

Officials also made a rare request for people not to line the streets outside the Senate building, where normally large crowds gather to witness the pomp and circumstance.

Click to play video: 'Mary Simon’s historic journey from an Inuit village to Rideau Hall' Mary Simon’s historic journey from an Inuit village to Rideau Hall
Mary Simon’s historic journey from an Inuit village to Rideau Hall – Jul 25, 2021

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